Collectivist teachurs!

A small town in the mountains between here and the state capital is home to a college that spits out teachurs, uh, teachers.

When these teachurs graduate, they wanna job, they want it now, and they don’t want any guff about it.

To realize their dreams, they do what all unhappy students do in this conflicted country:  They annoy the citizenry.

In the past week, the teachur wannabes have gone out to the highway to hijack intercity buses.  They now have a pasture at the school that has ten or 12 captured buses.  Who’s counting?

They let the passengers go.

Whether they freed the drivers is a matter of dispute.*

They have demands, of course. On graduating, they want a guaranteed job waiting. And they do not want to have to take any freaking exams to prove they’re qualified to teach.

Currently, all states in the nation require these exams save two, and our state is one of those two.

Just like in the United States, the biggest impediment to education here are teachur, uh, teacher unions, which are hidebound and interested solely in job security and pay.

The kids can go to Hell on a burro.

At least in the United States nobody thinks of hijacking buses. Teacher unions up north use other tactics that are just as effective for them and destructive to education and public welfare.

You likely ask:  Why don’t the cops do something?

Because since the Mexico City massacre of students back in 1968, which backfired in the government’s face, students are pretty much free to do whatever they want down here and get away with it.

Government is now afraid of students.  And it’s afraid of unions too.  It usually quakes at the sight of any large gathering.

Right on!

There’s a movie now making the rounds of theaters nationwide, a documentary focusing on the pathetic state of education here.

It’s titled Panzazo, and it points the accusatory finger at corrupt teacher unions, a redundancy.

While the police have yet to take action, the bus-driver union has cancelled all buses throughout the entire state.

This has caused major problems because buses play a far larger role in business and public transportation here than they do above the border.

There is irony. The driver union and the teachur wannabes ride the same political wagon.  They are collectivists.  Power to the people!

* * * *

* Update: Yes, they did hold the drivers, since last Friday, and late Wednesday night they released them in fine condition, so fine that some sympathized with the student teachurs.  I call that Stockholm Syndrome. Others would call it Labor Solidarity!

7 thoughts on “Collectivist teachurs!”

  1. F is a high-school teacher, and his union has done squat for him even though he’s had a few occasions where the union’s help would have been welcome. As for the horrid state of education, you should hear the stories he tells of extremely lazy, unmotivated students, egged on by their corpulent, lazy parents who have no iota of respect for education.

    Today’s story?

    He moved a girl in his class away from people that she was chatting with during class to another seat so she could perhaps concentrate on the lesson. Well, little miss floja, went home and complained to mommy that she was forced to sit next to a girl (a good student) whom she didn’t like. Señora Floja marched down to the school to complain. Meanwhile, poor F (who is overly conscientious about his job) had no idea that little miss Floja had issues with the new neighbor, and told mother that had her daughter simply asked him later to be seated elsewhere, he would have done so. But Señora Floja made a scene anyway.

    And the worst part?

    F is not sure he will get the support of his principal.

    That is one of the big problems with Mexican (and Gringo) education. Too many whiner kids backed up by whiner parents who are indulged by a spineless school.

    Sickening, really.

    Kim G
    Boston, MA
    Where we think that the teachers’ unions would lose whatever shred of support they may now have it they took to hijacking buses or planes. We can only hope it’s their next plan.

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  2. “[Government] usually quakes at the sight of any large gathering.”

    So true! They are totally ineffective during these situations.

    Teachurs in Mexico make the teachurs in the U.S. almost look like teachers. Really a sad situation causing one to pause at Mexico’s “developing nation” label. What will Mexico develop into with this situation?

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    1. Señor Calypso: I favor lots of stern discipline in many areas of life here, but nobody’s asking me. The students in this same school have a habit of going up to the highway every few weeks and setting up roadblocks to ask for financial support. I never give them anything and never will, but so many other drivers do, either because they support them or (more likely) they’re afraid not to. I don’t roll down my window. I don’t even stop. I just drive real slowly through them, and they part like the seas before what’s-his-name.

      If everybody would cease the contributions, the “students” would stop the foolishness, but ain’t gonna happen as long as it’s profitable.

      The school is an eternal breeding ground of young, ignorant leftists. I favor a small nuclear device and then salting the earth so young radical weeds can never grow there again.

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  3. The latest news I read regarding the standoff is that 14 drivers have been released yet others remain “secuestrado”. Talks have begun between the students and representatives of the state government but no agreement has been reached yet.

    Remember that the protestors of today may go on to be the teachers of tomorrow. What a depressing thought.

    Saludos,
    Don Cuevas

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    1. Don Cuevas: I drove from here to the capital yesterday afternoon. At the exit off the highway toward the town (return leg) there is an abandoned gas station. It was jammed with state cops in battle gear and waiting ambulances. I was hoping they would storm the place and knock some heads, but it seems that has not happened. Bunch of pansies.

      Yep, the teachers of tomorrow. But the teachers of today are identical, just older.

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