I’m a beaner

I like to rile folks by leaving sensible comments on Yahoo news stories.

My Yahoo profile, which is public, identifies me as a Gringo-Mexican. Strictly speaking, I am a Mexican-American due to having two passports, but I don’t use that label because I might be mistaken for a member of La Raza, a genuinely racist organization.

A comment I left on a story the other day inspired someone to label me a beaner, which was a first. It was based solely on my Yahoo profile, not on my comment. I have been called a racist, but who hasn’t?

It simply means you have bested a collectivist in a verbal joust.

But never a beaner.

I once was a member of the white ruling class, but now I am minority!

And I do love beans. Over white rice. With chopped onions. Andouille sausage. And Tabasco sauce from Avery Island, Louisiana.

16 thoughts on “I’m a beaner”

  1. This one seems easy. We agreed that cultured cream was a far better name than sour cream. In that same spirit, why don’t we just call you an American-Mexican. It keeps you out of the La Raza clan and adds a sufficient hint of confusion to keep the conversation rolling.

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  2. I do not feel like a gringa, even though I am called that in Spanish speaking countries. Therefore, I cannot sport the Ecuadorian-Gringa, as an identity. Any suggestions?

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    1. Andean: I thought you were born in Ecuador, so I am confused. If you were born in Ecuador, and do not have U.S. citizenship, call yourself an Ecuadoran or is it Ecuadorian? Beats me.

      If you do have U.S. citizenship, call yourself an American with none of that hyphenated malarkey (tip of the hat to Joe Biden).

      I think I would need a look at you to make the proper judgment. Appearances matter, especially these days. For instance, look at Obama. Everybody thinks he’s black.

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  3. I am a citizen of both countries. Born in Ecuador.

    I disagree, I may look like a Gringa — but I do not feel like one.

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  4. I feel like an American, and I am, in many senses of the word.
    A Gringa is a whole different story, and it can have different definitions in each different country, whether Spanish speaking or not.
    Feelings are sometimes hard to explain, eh?

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