Fried pig fat

Sunrise
An old photo, but the mountains have not moved.

Dawn usually finds me up, and I watch the sunrise over the mountains that I see clearly through the window over the computer screen where I am sitting, reading the morning news.*

Sometimes I step out to the upstairs terraza and look around town. There’s a pretty good view from this second floor, plus the Hacienda sits on a slope.

Thursday morning I noticed a house on the street out back has Christmas lights strung up with lots of colors lit. It was still dark out. I am an early bird.

The hammock is out there, and I wonder why I so rarely use it these days. Too cold in the mornings, but the afternoons work, but I’m usually otherwise occupied. I didn’t used to be otherwise occupied so often.

I really do little of anything, but the nothings that I do become different.

The outdoor patio in the yard is rarely used anymore either, although I keep the tabletop clean, the chairs too. I also wonder why I use that so rarely nowadays. It’s a mystery. One’s rhythms change without warning.

I sit quite a bit still in the downstairs terraza on one of the wicker rocking chairs. And I sit on the flaming red sofa in the living room to read the Kindle.

Most mornings, my child bride and I walk six laps around the neighborhood plaza, about 20 minutes. On Thursdays, a few folks set up stands to sell stuff. One of the stuffs sold is fried pork fat, chicharrón they call it.

Kind of like the cracklins of my youth. I like the smell, and I enjoy passing the stand every lap around the plaza. I inhale deeply for the memories.

* * * *

* The Washington Times, Newsmax, The Times of India, The National Post (Canada), Bloomberg and Reason 24/7. Occasionally, HuffPost for laughs. The internet is a glorious thing.

27 thoughts on “Fried pig fat”

    1. Señor Toth: I find just inhaling is best. They are pretty tasty though, I imagine. I took off about 50 pounds in the early 1980s, and I don’t want to tempt fate. If you can justify one bite, you can justify 100 bites … every day.

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  1. My husband would have to stop on every round by the stand. Fried pig fat is one of the favorites in his memories as a child in the oldest Polish community in the US. Panna Maria TX is very rural and when livestock was butchered, every family got parts and pieces. His family is Czech and his dad was school principal because the Polish wanted an outsider as a community figurehead to settle squabbles among the Polish people (all related in one way or another.)

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    1. Carole: I lived in Texas over 15 years, and I never heard of Panna Maria. But I take your word that it’s out there. As for fried pig fat, it’s best left to its good smells, I think.

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  2. “I really do little of anything, but the nothings that I do become different”…pretty much sums up life south of the border! A few chicharrones wouldn’t be so bad for you once in a while…just another couple of laps around the plaza…it’s our snack when playing parchesi on Sunday afternoons…

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    1. Charles: Parchesi! I haven’t thought of that in years. We have a backgammon board we never use. It would be nice to have a parchesi board we never use either. I’m gonna look for one.

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      1. We had a friend bring the Parchesi game down. We looked high and low and none here in GDL. You might find one in DF. I used to play with my grandmother. It can be quite competitive. Fabian loves it … also do Monopoly once in a while for a change.

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  3. Morning reading. The Cleveland and Akron papers, a copy of USA Today, news leads on AOL, The Economist and then postings on the history, science and Latin blogs I follow. Breakfast at 9 and off I go. I have a hard time sleeping past 5 AM. Life is too short to sleep it away.

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    1. Norm: I used to subscribe to the paper version of The Economist, but it comes too often. Monthly would be better. The weeklies just stacked up on me. I could get it online, but it’s expensive, and I’m cheap. Plus, it comes too often.

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      1. I seldom read the whole magazine, the Americas section always. I like the stats in the back. I buy the magazine because it is compiled offshore and deals with politics and economics as one subject. The bit of distance from my normal news sources is the frosting on the cake. The online feature is nice because there is a little more “real time” to its copy. We get an educator discount or we did when Linda was working. We’ll see how the next re-up goes.

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  4. I am up at 5 am, in the school by 6, prep for classes till 8, finish at 3, out of the school by 5, supper at 6, read, relax, maybe go for a swim, In bed by 10, and a new day starts again. I could use about another 4 hours in the day. I take one day a week off, usually a Saturday. Been thinking of going back to Mazatlan or Puerto Escondido, growing a beard, wearing sandals and ignoring the world. I could do this.

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    1. Bob: You and I are the same age. I quit working 13 years ago next Wednesday. Best move ever. I have a beard, such as it is. I also have sandals though I rarely use them here at this cool altitude. I don’t ignore the world as much as I should, but I do dodge people more than I should.

      All of which adds up to this: Come on down.

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  5. A hammock, a hot glass of Earl Grey, the Kindle or iPad, sometimes a sweater wraps the owner, unless the sun is out, makes a perfect day.

    I find that I have enough work to do around the house that is a low priority that doing outside stuff is not an option. My free time is too valuable at this stage of my life. Not eating the pork fat may extend the life perhaps two weeks or so, not sure if the sacrifice is worth it.

    I’ll have to get back to you on that!

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    1. Tancho: I think adding much pig fat to your diet would mean more than two weeks less of breathing. But that’s not the main thing for me. I just wanna be svelte. One feels better in general being svelte. I like feeling good.

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  6. Have you ever made a pork shoulder, stuffed with garlic cloves, in Spanish called, puerco ornado? The skin side up, in the oven, slowly cooked for 4-5 hours, then temperature turned up so the skin gets crispy? I scrape the fat off, the skin is delicious and cracklin, hot. Once a year indulgement — it is so worth it … umm.

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    1. Andean: Nope, never made that, never eaten it, never heard of it, but it sounds quite nice. If you pass by this area one day you may feel free to make it for my wife and me. I’ll buy the ingredients. Thanks in advance.

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      1. Absolutley, for you and your wife, and on a cold day a perfect meal, especially since you mentioned you both like garlic.

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  7. I get up at dawn to listen to the Great-tailed Grackles socialize in a nearby grove of trees. They also get together at sunset to have a little party everyday. I also get up early to buy bollos, fresh-baked Mexican rolls that often sell out at the local tiendas by 8:30. I cut them in half and fry them in olive oil with garlic powder and herbs. They are great for breakfast and I often make an egg sandwich with them. I go through a liter of olive oil every month. Who needs pork fat?

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      1. My Filipino friend, Eddie Alegre, in Florida was always invited to parties to fix the Lechon Baboy or roast pig. This was his favorite hobby and he always got first dibs on eating the pig skin. Unfortunately, poor Eddie died of a massive heart attack due to clogged arteries.

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  8. In Honduras, fried pork fat is called chicharrones. I don’t know why but no one ever says chicharron. I like the smell, too, and I am happy to say that my body reacts in a very disapproving manner if I eat them. It’s better that way.

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    1. Laurie: Called chicharrones here too, but we actually call it that out loud. And everybody’s body reacts in a disapproving manner on eating that stuff. Well, except the taste buds. I have been so grease-averse for decades that I can hardly eat a hamburger without my stomach rising up in revolt later. It’s best, I guess. I eat chicken often, lean pork now and then, beef almost never.

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