Curse of the Goddess

The curtains are closed.
The curtains are closed.

Last week, I officially declared winter gone. Not only gone but that it had never arrived. We had passed through winter with not one overnight freeze.

The Goddess cursed my arrogance.

Though most of March still sits in official winter, usually when we see the first of this month we are home free, sailing toward sultry Springtime.

Overnight freezes are common here in winter. Yet this season we had not suffered even one — a first, I believe, in my 13 years on the mountaintop.

But … ye gads!

As we lay under the goose-down comforter this morning looking at the window with the curtains closed, the datura tree presented a Rorschach test.

And out in the yard, the birdbath was frozen over, and yesterday’s green fronds of the banana trees hung limp and toasted. Curses!

Later this week* we’re going on a tropical vacation, our 11th anniversary. There will be no freezes there. The banana fronds and palms will be good and green. There will be Panama hats, guayaberas and sweat.

Later this morning, we tossed aside the down comforter and opened the curtains. Not too bad. By 10:30, it was 60 degrees outside. Freezes never last in daylight here, but that’s no consolation to the banana trees.

* Plans changed. No tropical trip just yet.

Curtains are open to the sunshine.

24 thoughts on “Curse of the Goddess”

  1. I don’t think we’ve seen 60 degrees since last October. Of couse a small part of Canada is actually south of my location. (The Detroit Metro area). I may have to wait until May 1 to launch the boat. April around here can be beautiful or brutal.
    Enjoy your trip to the tropics.

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  2. Just returned from Mazatlan, days were warm, nights kinda coolish, no tourists to speak of, bad for my Mexican friends, just about perfect for me. Enjoy the beach.

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    1. Señor Peterson: Yes, the rampant scare stories and misinformation from my former compatriots in the American news media are doing serious damage to many of us down here. Pathetic.

      Beach? We’re not going to the beach. We’re going to the jungle!

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  3. It was 49 F. here near Xalapa. But we had a home-built gas heater and a goose-down comforter. A glass of wine and buenas noches.

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    1. Carlos: Down comforters are better than warm milk. I love those things. We have two. Got a couple of gas heaters too, but we don’t sleep with the unvented things lit at night. Were I not a teetotaler, I’d have wine, but I do have buenas noches, which is possible without wine, something it took me decades to learn.

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  4. It was over a 100 when I rolled into Yucatan last week, three days of that and it cooled off 40 degrees. I saw people wearing gloves in the park this evening here in Ticul. Exploring the local ruins has been pleasant in the cool weather.

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    1. Norm: 100 degrees, yipes! The only Mayan ruins I’ve seen were in Palenque in January of 1999, and it was hot, hot, hot. Would be much better in the 60s, I’m sure. You are a lucky man.

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  5. I have a thermal, synthetic down, kingsize comforter that keeps me toasty all year long. There is no need for heating or cooling where I live in Uruapan. It feels cooler during the summer rainy season than it does during the dry season.

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      1. Last summer could have been an exception due to numerous tropical storms and hurricanes on both coasts. It rained practically everyday for a couple of hours, often in the afternoon when things normally warm up.

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  6. It is rumored to reach 40 (high) this week and so we will shed the heavy winter garb…in a few weeks it will be packed away for the season. Being one who finds heat insufferable, we are content.

    Palms, bananas, Panama hats, guayaberas and sweat would not bring vacation appeal to me. Lived in that long enough. But enjoy!

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    1. Ms. de Bois: My wife came down with a stubborn cold, so the trip got scratched. Won’t happen now till late autumn. I’m not going to the jungle in summertime. Or April either.

      I’m mystified by the 85 you wrote at the tail of your comment. I thought it was just an error till I noticed that you specifically italicized it. Are you guessing my age?

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      1. It was a notation error. 85 meant to explain the asterisk beside *heat. If you’d like to correct it feel free. It’s a bit embarrassing considering my profession in web languages. I know it is not your age by nearly two decades 🙂

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        1. Ahhhh, now I get it. I had already zapped the asterisk because I did not get that either. Thought it was a typo. You’re just too subtle for me.

          My age by “nearly” two decades? Unless you have mysteriously reached 48, it’s way more than two decades.

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  7. Well, this is embarrassing. I just realized my post this morning looks like an Oregon ripoff of yours. Frost in the morning. Sun later in the day. Of course, mine was really about the silliness of American doctors. The frost was merely a rather flimsy fig leaf.

    Will I ever be able to entice the two of you to my place at the beach? You would enjoy it — for a couple of days.

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    1. Tut, tut, Steve. Don’t try to pretend that you did not copy me. It’s nothing to be ashamed of. Many people do it, with varying degrees of success. It only proves that you know quality when you see it. Be proud.

      As for visiting your beach, there are a few reasons that likely will never happen. Primarily, that one Pacific Mexican beach looks like all the others, more or less, so why drive farther than necessary? Our closest beach is three hours away on the autopista while God knows how many hours it would take to drive up to your beach, and what would we find different there? Just you.

      Now that has significant worth, I admit, your sparkling personality and all, but … it’s a long, long drive. Better that you drive to us. Thanks.

      And keep on copying the Moon. You could do far, far worse.

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