Out to lunch

restaurant
View from our table.

After scarcely leaving the Hacienda yesterday, I had ants in my pants.

This inspired me today to drive the lovely couple that we are to a lakeside, rural restaurant about 30 minutes from home. The dining establishment is called Kutzaro, and it’s one of my favorites anywhere.

The fried seafood is superb. The service is good. The view is spectacular. And if you go on a weekday you’ll have the whole joint mostly to yourself.

I ordered fried shrimp, which I always do at Kutzaro because I am a critter of habit. When I find something good, I stay on its path. If other routes are better, I will rarely know it. Some say that’s a personality defect.

My child bride ranges farther afield on the menu. She is an adventurous woman. She ordered fried fish filets and pronounced them excellent.

What she actually said was excelente.

Before the main dishes, we had surimi tostadas. And we ordered lemonade. Kutzaro serves great lemonade in a large beer glass, colored with the red of those cherries that come in a jar, which I prefer to fresh cherries.

Call me a hillbilly.

We paid, hopped into the Honda, and left. We continued the circular drive around the entire lake, which takes about an hour, and it’s an excelente thing to do if you’ve got ants in your pants. And shrimp in your tummy.

View from the parking lot.

41 thoughts on “Out to lunch”

  1. I suppose if your wife is adventuresome enough to marry a gringo, then menu choices should be a snap for her.

    Looks like a funky place. I’ll have to check it out the next time I’m there.

    Saludos,

    Kim G
    Boston, MA
    Where there are plenty of places you can get fried fish, clams, shrimp, you name it.

    Like

    1. Kim: It’s not quite as funky as that bottom photo indicates. The building to the left, the unfinished planks, is the kitchen. The dining area is the brick building farther on with all the windows. And there is a second one past that.

      Clams? Never understood why people eat clams, little rubbery things. Oysters are another matter altogether. But you never see fried oysters in restaurants here. Never. Maybe in Mexico City or Guadalajara.

      Like

      1. I’m not a big fan of whole clams either. Steamers? Ugh! But chop up the clams, sautee them with parsley, green onion, garlic, pepper, lemon juice, and touch of white vermouth, and you have a fantastic sauce for capellini. And if you add the clams last and only just heat them, they don’t get rubbery.

        Like

      2. If you’ll tell me where the restaurant is located, I’ll tell you where you can get fried oysters. (And not very far away.) I have yet to try them here.

        Fried belly clams are a wonderful treat. (not those little, breading coated strips of rubber, like HoJo used to serve.)

        Saludos,
        Don Cuevas

        Like

        1. Don Cuevas: I’m surprised you’ve not visited the Kutzaro. It’s the best of the lake restaurants by far, at least of the ones I have visited, and I’ve visited quite a few.

          Like

          1. Maybe we will go there when two of my sisters-in-law are visiting, if we will have already assimilated the carnitas we will have in Quiroga.

            One other question: is the surimi line-caught or netted?

            Saludos,
            Don Cuevas

            Like

            1. Don Cuevas: As everyone knows, surimi can only be caught within an hour of dawn in certain latitudes. You must hunker down behind a fallen tree trunk and net it as it speeds by. There is no other way.

              Like

      1. Could that be the restaurant now known as 224 Boston? (Its address.) That restaurant is very funky, has a small garden in its front yard, and sits across the street from a kind of industrial looking area. If that’s the one, I’d agree with you. The food is OK, but the ambiance is wonderful. It’s not too far from where I live.

        Like

          1. True, it was on my agenda for this summer until Roy got sick. That kind of put a damper on things. One of these days.
            Lovely weather here now. Warm during the day and open window sleeping at night. 28 C. at the moment, perfect!!!!

            Like

  2. Que vida tienes, Felipe! I am jealous! Keep on having fun! I enjoy these type of posts. Takes my mind off of our failing, inept, greedy government here!! 😉

    Like

    1. Hold on to that jealousy, Mike, and when you get a few more years on you it will inspire you to do something similar. As for your failing, inept, greedy government, well, yep, that’s what you’ve got. And it ain’t gonna get any better, I fear.

      Like

  3. Great title. Sometimes it’s just good to be “out to lunch.” When I am in Mexico I enjoy fried fish, not heavily battered though. I now like clams on the half shell (raw) they are not rubbery (that’s when they are overcooked).

    Horse radish, limón, and a spicy salsa on top, yum. Same goes for fresh oysters. I must admit it was an acquired taste. I’m glad to have tried.

    Like

    1. Andean: I’ve been out to lunch for a lot of years now. And sometimes it entails food. I’ve never tried raw clams, just raw oysters, which I do love though I eat them no more, certainly not down here. I wouldn’t trust them.

      Like

      1. And we are one mind with the raw stuff there. I was advised by mi hermana.

        Are you inviting all of us to (your town)? It is really on my bucket list maybe one day.

        Like

      2. Raw clams are stronger tasting than most of the raw oysters I’ve had. For a really unusual treat (?), try pata de mula, which exudes a black liquid as served at Mariscos La Güera.

        DC

        Like

        1. Looked up “pata de mula” and don’t recognize those. I have had many types of clams, and they do go by different names…

          Like

          1. When you ate your first oyster on the half shell, what were you thinking as you got ready to slurp it down?

            The patas de mulas are small, the shell is ribbed, and the meat is firm and dark. The first time I saw them at La Güera, a friend ordered them. I was fearful for him. Pero no pasó nada. I thought at the time their smell was kind of pungent. But years later, when they arrived, unexpectedly on an Ensalada de Mariscos, I noticed no particular smell and they tasted o.k. I thought that they were pretty good, yet I have no craving to eat them frequently.

            DC

            Like

            1. Señor Cuevas: I ate my first raw oyster in the bar adjoining Schwegmann’s supermarket on Airline Highway in Metairie, Lousiana, some time in the 1970s. I do not recall what I was thinking. I was, however, a couple of sheets to the wind on Dixie beer. Otherwise, I would not have eaten my first raw oyster.

              I imagine one remembers the first raw oyster in the same way one remembers losing one’s virginity.

              Like

  4. Call me anything you want, but don’t call me late for a seafood dinner. I eat fish several times a week at home, so when I go out I like to order shrimp tempura, jambalaya, paella, seafood casseroles and arroz con mariscos.

    Like

    1. Andres: If you have found jambalaya in a restaurant there, which I seriously doubt, you are a lucky man. I have to make my own jambalaya, and I do a pretty good job of it. And a couple of weeks ago, I made gumbo, another decent piece of work, and far more complicated than jambalaya. As for paella, I have yet to encounter decent paella in a Mexican restaurant.

      Like

      1. The Restaurante “Titanic”, a large multi-story wooden (?) building, near Senguio,on the old Morelia Airport road, has jambalaya on their menu. I was totally turned off when the manager told us it had lettuce in it.

        DC

        Like

  5. I love being “out to lunch” and eating pan-fried shrimp (leave off the batter please), but my very favorite is ceviche and in that you better leave out the octopus. 😉

    Like

      1. Ah, I missed the location reply until now, Thank you.

        Here’s your fried oyster reward: Mariscos La Güera: “ostiones empanizados.” If you want tartar sauce, you may have to bring your own. Or it might be fun to concoct your own from mayonnaise, chopped onion, cilantro, pickles?? etc.

        Yesterday we had Tacos de Pescado at Lupita’s. Very good, but as a snack, not as a main meal. Order the Papas Fritas Francesas to bulk it out. The papas are first rate.

        DC

        Like

        1. Don Cuevas: I’m guessing, and I would be amazed if I’m wrong, that those oysters are the little, puny ones you find in most places outside of Louisiana.

          As for Lupita’s, we eaten at the new location just once, and found it lacking. I doubt we will return.

          Like

          1. Re: Lupita’s. While hardly my favorite restaurant, and undoubtedly overrated by the Gringo crowd, it nevertheless is a pleasant place with decent food. And, any restaurant can have a bad day. If I recall, your recent visit was soon after they reopened.

            My favorite place to eat (here) is at home.

            Saludos,
            Don Cuevas

            Like

      2. This “Lake” you have written about: is it in North America? Is it south of the Tropic of Cancer?
        These questions need to be answered in order to satisfy the insatiable cravings of fanatic foodies, como yo estoy.

        Saludos,
        Don Cuevas

        Like

Comments are closed.