Muffins, apples, rain, death

muffins

AWAKENING AFTER an overly rainy day brings many new things, some related to the rain, some not.

1. Fallen apples.  The gumpy neighbors next door have an apple tree that abuts our property wall. It is common for the mentally challenged to plant little things in inappropriate places, not thinking years down the line. And then tall trees grow from small saplings. They outgrow their diapers. The tree now provides two things: apples that often fall on our side and a night roost for their chickens to cackle at us in the mornings.

The apples are nice, and the chickens are, well, poultry. Yesterday’s rain knocked down lots of apples!

2. Dead datura.  I occasionally post photos of our glorious golden datura, and it is glorious indeed for a spell. Then it dies … or is knocked down by heavy rain. This morning I picked up 50-60 datura blooms from the soggy ground. The Lord giveth and She taketh back too. Or rather, She smotes down. Watch out for Her!

3. Dead cat.  At 9 a.m. I drove to the downtown casita to let the maid in for the occasional cleaning. Just across the cobblestone street in a patch of grass was a dead Siamese cat. Her eyes were open, but she was a goner. This has nothing to do with the rain, I guess, but dead cats are not what you want to see when the maid arrives.

4. Muffins.  This too has squat to do with rain or apples or dead datura or stone-cold cats, but I include it here anyway because it is delicious, a positive life thing, which we need at this moment. Those are sweet tater and cinnamon muffins up there, which my child bride has added to her Saturday offerings on the plaza.

The intricate tapestry of life.

Those of you who live far away don’t know what you are missing.

33 thoughts on “Muffins, apples, rain, death”

  1. We have tons of peaches on the trees and on the ground in our yard. I don’t use them, as they must be cooked with sugar to be palatable. They are a pain to peel. Our neighbors, though, appreciate them, so we freely give them away.

    Saludos,
    Don Cuevas

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    1. Señor Cuevas: Being a native of the Peach State (Georgia), I laugh at these Mexican peaches. They are beyond pathetic. My wife, however, thinks they are grand. But that’s because they are the only peaches she knows.

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    1. Ms. Shoes: Most years we have peaches up the kazoo. They fall all over the place. They rot on the ground where I have to scoop the little (by then) slimy boogers up. Oddly, last year, there were hardly any, but most years there are millions. The tree is just getting cranked up right now. Wait and month and give me a holler.

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      1. Ms. Shoes: I surely do know who detoured us off to peaches. It was a rhetorical query. As for why the muffins weren’t made with apples, it’s because they’re muffins of sweet taters and cinnamon.

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      2. Ms. Shoes: I just passed through the kitchen where chaos reigns at this hour. I washed the towering pile of pans and dishes in the sink. I also noticed one — just one — apple mini-pie made from the neighbors’ fruit. I asked the cook why she only made one. No more dough, she said.

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        1. Apple pie — my favorite. Only one, and you are not claiming it. Do you deliver?

          Felipe, start collecting more apples. And buy more flour for dough!

          When does the season warm up there?

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          1. Andean: I already had my eye on the sweet potato. I only eat one item (usually) from the basket each Saturday, and I’ve had the apple numerous times before. As for getting more apples and dough, I leave that up to the cook.

            When does it warm up here? Hardly ever. It gets a bit warm and stuffy inside the house upstairs in April and May in the afternoons and early evenings. That’s about it.

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  2. Sometimes, things take off and start a life of their own. I like peaches. At my house in Mazatlan, I had a banana tree. I don’t like bananas, wish I had a peach tree.

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    1. Bliss: I wish I could tell you that I prayed a moment and crossed myself over the cat’s dead body, but if I said that, I’d be lying.

      As for the muffins, they are truly great, as is everything she cooks. And marries.

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  3. My datura plant has come back from the dead. I hope for a nice crop of blooms which has happened before in more temperate temps.

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  4. The “intricate tapestry of life” always exists, no matter where one lives. It unfolds on its own, and produces interesting patterns depending on, one’s artistic abilities, journey, and even the path one may encounter.

    Those muffins look delicioso. But so do all of your esposa’s homemade pastries. If I lived there I’d be one of her best customers!

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      1. But that would be South America. And, yes, family abounds. No lack of good pastries there, and the “helados de paila” are superb (everyone else got off topic). 🙂

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        1. Andean: Yes, I know where you hatched, but we’re all one big Latino family south of Texas. Got no idea what paila is. I looked it up and got three definitions, none of which seem correct in your context.

          1. Large dish.
          2. Frying pan.
          3. Luggage compartment.

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  5. Are you learning another language?

    I do wonder why “helados” are not made this way in many countries. It’s like eating fresh fruit.

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  6. I do “live far away” (sorta) — but I am far too aware of what I am missing.

    By the way, I finally talked with the good folks at Banamex USA. Even though my letter has yet to arrive, my account will be strangled on 30 June. Thanks for letting me know of the death sentence.

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    1. Tancho: She only made four. They went into the fridge and will be on the menu today. I intend to buy and eat one. Yes, I pay. That leaves three. She makes lots of different items, so usually only a few of each product is available.

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  7. Camote (sweet potatoes) is the Rodney Dangerfield of fruits and veggies. It certainly deserves more respect. Camote is ranked number one in nutrition of all vegetables. It is very high in beta-carotene, vitamin A, dietary fiber and minerals. It is native to Central and South America and is easy to grow.

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    1. Andrés: Sweet potatoes may be the Rodney Dangerfield to others, but I’ve been a fan all my life. Baked, cut open, sprinkled with brown sugar and good bit of butter. Yum! Now that’s eating.

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      1. Andean: Actually, they are camotes. I assumed they were sweet potatoes, and I just went to a Spanish-English online translator, which tells me they are indeed sweet potatoes.

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