Mexico, 1935

HERE IS an interesting video. It is, as the headline has already revealed, Mexico in 1935, a tour from the border taken by a couple of Gringos in a Chrysler of the era. I never knew those old cars were so sturdy.

If you just want to see the tour and avoid the introductory babble, start at about the four-minute mark. In the latter half of the video the intrepid travelers go to a bullfight in Mexico City’s Plaza México, the biggest bullring in the world, then and now. The two of us went to a bullfight there a few years ago. I wrote about it. It was my first bullfight and, I imagine, my last. I do not object on moral grounds, just not my type of thing.

And then they visit Teotihuacán, the pre-Aztec ruins north of Mexico City. My then-intended took me there in 2002, not long after we met. It was very hot. I was not young, even then. I purchased a bottle of water and climbed to the top of the Pyramid of the Sun to make an impression on the young woman. Almost killed me.

I got a chuckle out of one video moment. It’s common to hear Gringos oooh and ahhh over how friendly the locals are. The narrator repeats this myth as the camera pans across four or five Mexican men scowling at the lens.

It’s a fun and interesting video, even if you are not fortunate enough to live here.

16 thoughts on “Mexico, 1935”

  1. It is truly an interesting video. I have also been to one bullfight many years ago. I agree with you on bullfights. Have seen one and it was enough.

    Like

    1. Mike M: Though I have no interest in returning, I do favor the fascinating tradition. Alas, it is going the way of the dodo bird. When we were there, they huge stadium was very sparsely inhabited, nothing like what you see in the video. Interest is simply waning, and I don’t like that.

      I am personally acquainted with a real matador. I saw him listed on a bullfight poster in the state capital once. His weekday job is a housing developer. He built our downtown casita and I talked to him a number of times during the purchase period. A short fellow, proving once again the existence of the Napoleonic Complex suffered by many little guys. He is handsome though, in spite of the scars on his face. I imagine there are more beneath his shirt and pants. I liked him. I told him I thought he was nuts to be a matador. He smiled. From what I learned he’s pretty far up the matador hierarchy. He looked to be about 35 at that time, four years ago. Name is Chacón. Drives a Mercedes.

      Like

  2. Wonderful, thank you. I was once married to a Mexican man for 12 years. Sadly, it did not last, but the video and music brought back many lovely memories. Rosalie

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rosalie: Glad you enjoyed the video. Your comment brings up an interesting point. I do not, of course, know the details of your failed marriage, but I do know that Mexican men can be, uh, challenging husbands. Infidelity is rampant, as is drinking. It is not so rare that after marriage the Mexican man begins to view his wife as a nursemaid, housekeeper and cook while he goes out and finds himself a girlfriend … or two … or three. It was awareness of this that kept my wife single till she was 42 and met me.

      Mexican women, on the other hand, make stupendous wives as it has been my joy to discover first-hand. And by observation of others.

      Like

      1. Yes there are many challenges….in our case it was partly adapting to life in Canada and the self discipline and motivation one has to make to survive in a new culture. He could be a very hard worker and could accomplish so many things if he wished to. We built a small home outside of Cuernavaca in a tiny town and after 12 years he decided it was “less challenging” to get the house and stay in Mexico. Even though it was a tremendous shock at the time, years later I still remember my time in Mexico as unforgettable, an experience I would not trade for the pain. He ended up “selling” the house for a new car and $14,000. He is now 72 and has to work everyday for the rest of his life in order to eat. The choices he made were very sad for both of us at the time however I have recovered nicely. People find it odd that I am not angry about the events of the time however you would know how enticing the country and people are and I still feel very blessed to have lived there for the years I did.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Rosalie: Interesting story and one that does not surprise me. The mindset here is so different. I liken it to living in Alice’s Wonderland because so many things simply make no sense to us who grew up above the Rio Bravo. You must really adapt, and he would have had to really adapt to live in Canada too. Long-term thinking is not very prevalent here, so your ex’s taking $14,000 and a car for his house comes as no surprise. I have seen such things.

          If you have the financial capability, I urge you to come on down for good. It’s not as good as it used to be. It’s far better.

          Like

  3. The last bullfight I attended was in Madrid in 1964, and the place was packed. Most folks are too squeamish now to see cockfights and bullfights, yet they watch endless violence on TV, movies and video games on the computer and we spend trillions on our military.

    Like

      1. A fun video and thanks for sharing. Liked it all including the music. Wonder where they found gasoline between Saltillo and San Luis Potosi and DF?

        Saw a cockfight before a Juan Gabriel concert in Nuevo Laredo many years ago. Was quite fascinating for an old hillbilly.

        And yes, Mexican women are the gems of Mexico. I think most Mexican men simply take them for granted and have no idea how good they have it.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. In 1985 I attended my one and only bull fight in Malaga, Spain. Eight were on on the ticket. I made it through 5. Not my thing.

    Like

    1. Patzman: I sat through the whole thing. It did get a bit repetitious. I have read that bullfights in which the matador is not very good it can get pretty grisly. Being the Plaza México, I imagine the guys I watched were top-notch, so everything went fairly smoothly. It was not unduly grim. But still, I have no interest in repeating the experience. I was bored before the last fight.

      But, oddly even to me, I support the tradition. I don’t want it to die out, which it seems to be doing.

      Like

  5. That was a very interesting video. I would not have thought that THAT early of an automobile would be so reliable & sturdy to go through all that. Thanks for sharing that.

    Like

    1. Mike: I too was surprised at the car. I doubt any modern car could do it except for 4WD vehicles, and probably even some of them could not. I don’t really know anything about cars of that era, but I imagine they were made like tanks in many ways, especially after seeing this video. Obviously, that Chrysler was not delicate.

      Like

Comments are closed.