The dilemma

ranchito2014

IF YOU GET into the Honda, stick it in reverse, back up till the car’s butt-side is sitting midway inside the opposite carport (The Nissan must be gone), look out the driver’s window, this is what you’ll see. It’s long been one of my favorite Hacienda shots, and this is not the first time I have photographed it.

I remain surprised at the greenery hereabouts since this is not the coastal tropics of Mexico. We sit high in the mountains in the middle of the country. Fruit off those banana trees are not edible, but the trees thrive and lend a romantic, sultry air. The house is just over 11 years old. We designed and built it.

THE DILEMMA

We have no children. Who will get this place after we are Promoted to Glory? This dilemma ultimately, of course, will be my child bride’s. Being 16 years her senior, the probability of my exiting first are overwhelming.

She has lots of Mexican relatives, of course — they all have lots of relatives — but many are, in my opinion, of highly questionable character. I have no will. Don’t need one because I own nothing. This house, the casita downtown and the condo in Mexico City are all in my child bride’s name. Same for the two cars. And financial resources in my name automatically go to her. So — got no Last Will & Testament.

She does have one, however, and we made it out years ago. Everything goes to her sister here in town. But that sister needs this place like she needs another cigarette in her mouth or another Coca-Cola in her hand. Plus, that sister is not a giving, loving soul. In short, I want this changed. But to who?

A top contender is a niece, about 30, who recently married a very good guy. Said niece already has two sons from previous “relationships,” and the idea that she’s the top contender tells you quite a bit about the other relatives. The marriage is only about 18 months old, and the jury is out on whether she will pull it off with this great guy that fell into her lap. I try to stay optimistic, though in truth I am not.

Another contender, who’s only 11 now, the adopted son of the above-mentioned sister, likely will be well set due to his mother’s many properties, places she inherited by pure luck. We favor this young fellow, but all the others could use a windfall far more than he could.

There are others too. Nieces, nephews, sisters, brothers. What likely will happen is that a number will be thrown into the pot, and the properties will have to be sold to split the spoils. I won’t care because I’ll be playing a harp or, even better, enjoying my 72 virgins. That will require converting to Mohammedanism at the very last moment.

It could get tricky.

Mexico has a Last Will and Testament Sale every September when the lawyers do them for half-price. We’ll be taking advantage of that in six weeks. To include yourself, send your name and vitals.

24 thoughts on “The dilemma”

  1. I basically have the same issue you do, wife has enough stuff in her name to be fine after I kick the bucket, so I am considering leaving it to a favorite charity that could use the money or they can sell it or my other assets of what may be left.

    I do refuse to leave it to anyone who really doesn’t need it. I have seen too many families or children start fighting over things like that. I also don’t want to spoil anyone, too many kids get spoiled especially when their parents left them lots of assets and stuff … they fritter it all away and then wind up without much or worse.

    Lots of needy charities around, just need to be sure that they are legit.

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    1. Tancho: I like the charity route, but my wife would never put a charity over blood relatives. It’s simply not the way they think, and I will not be around to influence her at that time.

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  2. It would be rather exciting to do research and find an unsuspecting, rather random but needy soul to will your beautiful property to. Meantime, you can feel joy concerning the prospect of “moving on”. On the other hand, your subject matter reminds me of several old people I know! 🙂

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  3. It’s my understanding that the discount wills notarios prepare during September’s Will Month only prepare basic “I love you” wills. Wills beyond the usual boilerplate are prepared at the prevailing rates. So, there is nothing to be gained by waiting for the September rush if you have an estate plan that would involve anything more than leaving it all to your beloved spouse.

    I really am not inclined to leave anything to charity, but beyond a sister, I, too, am lacking in relatives. So friends may find themselves saddled with the largesse.

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    1. Ms. Shoes: I did not know that about the will sale. So it would be smart to not wait. Thanks. Actually, I was thinking of your similar situation as I was writing this.

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  4. So, if your wife has a will that leaves everything to her sister and your wife happens to kick before you, does that mean that you get nothing and your cigarette smoking sister in law can kick you to the curb?

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    1. Connie: Obviously, I left something out. The current will has me as the first beneficiary. The sister would only come into play were I dead already. I ain’t quite that big a fool. Gotta keep my butt covered.

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  5. Name: Mike G. Vitals: Living, breathing and have a pulse. (I think) 😉

    Just kidding, Felipe. I kind of like the niece option you mentioned. I hope they have a long and happy marriage and are blessed with a couple (or lots if they want that) of kids!

    LOVE The shot of the yard too!!! Very tropical!

    Mike

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    1. Mike G.: You would be high on the list were it up to me, but I imagine that if we included you that my wife would change it posthaste after my demise. Sorry. As for the niece and her new hubby, there will be no more kids because the niece got her tubes tied after the last kid was born. I guess she did not want to follow in her mother’s footsteps who squirted them out regularly and never bothered to marry anybody. Oh, the stories I could tell you people.

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  6. I’ve got to draw your attention to Connie’s reply above. You should be your wife’s beneficiary with someone else as a contingent beneficiary. You’re probably correct in your assumption that you’ll die first but, if you don’t, you’re going to have a mess on your hands. Just sayin’ …

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    1. Loulou: As I replied to Connie, I left out the essential point that I am the first beneficiary of everything on my wife’s will. Her sister only would figure into the deal if I were dead already, which I probably will be when my wife dies. Of course, her sister is only one year younger but smokes like a tire factory and chugs Coca-Cola, and will likely sail off into the sunset well before my wife. The will just has to be changed drastically, and it will be … soon.

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  7. That house is going to need a lot of TLC over the next 30 or 40 years, so I would leave it to whomever has the where-with-all (income) to maintain it in manner to which it has become accustomed. I’d say put me on the list, but at 74, I have one foot in the grave and the other on a banana peel.and I also don’t have the where-with-all (income).

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    1. Paul: My wife finally has a plan. Only one person will get an intact house, and that is the downtown casita. The Hacienda and the Mexico City condo will go to multiples. They will have to sell to split the cash. I would like to leave it to you but, as you note, you are so much older than I am that you have no a chance of outliving me.

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  8. It seems your young nephew in Mexico is close to you and your wife so he would likely be an heir to the estate. I am a proponent of leaving something to a charity, especially if the charity fulfilled a need during your lifetime. M. D. Anderson is always my first choice when making a donation and I donate to them every year. They help so many people receive the best care, even when they do not have they money to pay for it.

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    1. Connie: That boy is going to receive everything his mama has, and that is quite a lot. It’s more than we have. He sure will not need our help. As for M.D. Anderson, yes, I know it’s a great place, one advantage of living in Houston if one is unfortunate enough to need such a place. I keep my own fingers crossed.

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  9. Even if you do not live in Houston it is available to you, as you know. My mother was treated and died there in 2003. All she had was Medicare with no supplemental insurance. They never charged her anything over the amount that medicare did not cover. She had no assets and my husband and I paid for her prescriptions which were deeply discounted because of her financial situation. I donate so they can continue to help others who find themselves in the same situation as my mother. This is why I am passionate about M D Anderson. I know that others have had the same experience with other facilities or organizations.

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  10. Longevity is in my genes. I don’t smoke, rarely drink, and have no heirs. I am younger than you and your child bride. I have lived an adventuresome life, and I speak Spanish. If you wife precedes you, and then you go, GIVE IT TO ME!

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    1. Ms. Chica: I’ll have to give that some prayerful consideration.

      By the way, your comment went first to the moderation line because you had a typo in your moniker. It thought you were someone new. I left the typo, by the way.

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      1. I don’t doubt your devotion to prayer. However, now that Grace and Marty are gone, I should get a slightly higher consideration. I am an avid gardener, and I would keep the bougainvillea bougainvillea in check.

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