32 thoughts on “One old town”

  1. That does look interesting. Going to be in that area in Feb/Mar so must add it to the must see list. Hear there are often interesting people taking coffee on the town square.

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    1. He gets his for free, Steve. You will have to pay. But, it is the best coffee in Patzcuaro. Do NOT stay in the San Rafael on the plaza. The only miserable part of our trip. Hot water limited to certain hours, no heater or AC, and wifi only in the lobby, if you sit in a certain chair and hold your tongue just right. Ask Felipe to tell you the name of the restaurant in the Pemex Station – I can’t remember it – but the Tarascan Soup ( local dish) is wonderful. One last piece of advice – work a side trip to Tzintzuntzan into your trip – wonderful 16th century cathedral and straw market and visit Santa Clara del Cobre to watch the coppersmiths whose families have been working in copper for 8 generations. They put on a great demonstration using equipment that has not changed in 500 years.

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      1. Bonnie: While it is true that I do not pay for coffee in that locale, anyone with me does. I treat. And if you think it has the best coffee in town, you must have hit a very lucky moment. Normally, no way, José.

        And yes, I would not recommend that hotel. But few places here have AC or heat because they usually are not required, especially AC. It can get quite nippy, however, on January and February nights.

        As for the Pemex restaurant, again, your recent trip was too brief. Better Sopa Tarasca is available in other eateries. By far.

        And I’m with you on Santa Clara and Tzintzuntzan. Of course, before going to Tzintzuntzan you have to pass a test proving you can say Tzintzuntzan.

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      2. Thank you for the great advice. I’ve logged it away in Evernote since I have trouble remembering what I just had for breakfast…Felipe doesn’t have that problem even though we are from the same era, the same city, and, almost, same high school.

        As for hotel, we won’t need one since we bring ours with us since we must bring 2 cats and 2 dogs. Mexicans, like Felipe, call it a casa rondante (hope I spelled that right). Up here it is called a motor home. I will have to find an RV park but understand there are some. This will be my 3rd long trip but the first in the Colonial part … previous were East and West coast.

        Cafecito with Felipe in that beautiful city … wish we could leave to go there now. I’ll buy since I am a rich Gringo and Señor Felipe is but a poor Mexican.

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        1. Steve: Casa rodante. You were only one letter off, pretty good. There used to be a trailer park just up the highway from me, but I think it’s defunct now. I guess there are others, sure. Never been in the Highlands, eh? It’s the best part of Mexico without a doubt, especially because you’re not sweating all day.

          And yes, I am a poor Mexican, incredibly disadvantaged, all of which gives me the right to sneak into the United States. Maybe next year, I’ll sneak up there. Plenty of handouts, I hear. Maybe I’ll get an Obamaphone.

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        2. Steve, there is a FB page called ” on the road in Mexico” run by a guy who is a full time RV traveler and there are always recommendations of places to camp in Mexico. After we visited Mexico the first time, we went back to the USA and sold our almost-new travel trailer. Sorry Felipe, I like the coffee on the plaza better than any place else in Patzcuaro. and once I tasted Tarascan soup, I ate it at every place we dined in Patzcuaro, I came home and looked up the recipe in Diane Kennedy’s cookbook and made a huge batch. Oh yeah, I forgot to mention that the bread in Patzcuaro is delicious – the baker in one shop told us it is because he uses a sponge as a starter – kind of like sour dough. I would visit again for the bread and soup.

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          1. Panadería La Espiga, unmarked by any sign, is in a house in a colonia on the northwest side of Pátzcuaro. Sourdough rolls baked in a wood fired oven. Arrive before 10 a.m. before the bread is sold out.
            http://mexkitchen.blogspot.mx/2006/06/la-espigauna-panaderia-tradicional.html
            The same bread is also available in limited quantities, sold by a woman out of a basket, to the side of tiends Don Chuchos, on Calle Tampico.

            Saludos,
            Don Cuevas

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      1. Perhaps, amigo, perhaps. I have tended to bounce from one end of this continent to the other. Nonetheless, returning to the land of my enchanted dreams is a constant temptation that I have learned to live with. I must admit, ending up back in colonial Mexico would be okay with me should fate once again place me there. Alas, I am truly a rolling stone.

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  2. It is a nice place to revisit every year. We will be passing through on the fourth week in January. We may see you on the plaza.

    Bruce

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    1. Bruce: Don’t hide. Say hi. You’re my favorite sort of Gringo. You visit, and you leave. Too many folks are moving here, placing us in peril of becoming another cursed, Gringo-infested San Miguel de Allende.

      I oppose that, of course. I got here before most of them, by God.

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      1. You’re not exactly doing a great job of keeping Gringos away, what with posting lovely photos, and now this video. (Which, admittedly had its comic moments, like when the announcer talks about the quality of people while showing a woman inspecting her fingernails, hahaha.)

        But really. I don’t know what to say. Part of you seems to have an unconscious wish for more Gringo neighbors. I did my best for you a year and a half ago with my “How I Survived the Horrors of Pátzcuaro” post, but you’ve now gone and undone all my good work.

        ¡Ay, Caramba!

        Kim G
        Boston, MA
        Another ugly, hellhole of a place with too many Gringos.

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        1. Kim: You are quite right. I can be my own worst enemy. Blame it on senility. An unconscious wish for more Gringo neighbors? Not on your life, but there are some nice folks I know through this medium who would not be an unwelcome addition to the community. But generally speaking, I want them all to go to San Miguel or the Chapala area. Plus, they’ll be less likely to freeze their butts off there.

          As for your Horrors of Patzcuaro post, didn’t you delete that or backtrack in some way because one or two people “got offended”? I believe so, and you should be ashamed of yourself. You could be the president of Yale or some such thing. Of course, I could be thinking of something altogether different. It happens.

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            1. Kim: Good to hear you’re still chasing people away from here. Actually, our state’s bad rep serves a purpose in that regard. Totally bogus reputation, but don’t tell anyone, please.

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              1. Ah, but there you’ve also undermined yourself. I seem to recall a recent post where you and La Guapa Señora went for a walk and marveled (tongue in cheek, of course) at how you failed to find any danger.

                Admit it: you really just want more Gringos around there, if only to write about their foibles.

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                1. Kim: Sometimes I find appealing topics that conflict with my better judgment. By the way, I have not used “La Guapa Señora” in years, not since Calypso kidnapped the term from me. I believe he still uses it.

                  I have moved on, however.

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  3. Nice music track. Sounds like it may have been a recording of the Michoacan State symphony. So glad we’ve seen Patz in person multiple times.

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  4. In the poetic lyrics of an old song by Tommy Edwards, you live on the morning side of the mountain and I live on the twilight side of the hill. Michoacan is a great place to live.

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