Dishwasher moon

moon

I’M THE CHIEF dishwasher at home. My wife can wash dishes, of course, but her method lasts 10 times longer.

I imagine it’s something she learned as a child, living with hundreds of siblings* where dishes were allowed to dry in the sink a spell before getting washed.

Tossing dishes into the sink after a meal to be washed later creates a far greater task than simply washing them on the spot. Once food dries, it’s way more work.

Procrastinators are their own worst enemies.

Don’t even mention automatic dishwashers, a dreadful invention that is not Earth-friendly, takes up space, reduces your exercise, and is just plain silly anyway.

Decent people wash their own dishes and the best of them do it immediately. I am one of those decent people.

I was washing dishes yesterday evening when I looked out the window over the sink and spotted the moon. That’s what I saw in the photo above. It wasn’t even dark yet.

Since good things tend to come in twos, I decided to take another photo, so I stepped out to the veranda — the dishes were done — and snapped the photo below.

The hat on the left used to be mine. The one on the right belonged to the Rachmaninoff Cowboy, and on the hook between them are Hare Krishna beads. For about two seconds of my life, I considered joining the Hare Krishnas.

But I didn’t.

I decided to wash dishes under Mexican moonlight.

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*Mexicans are hearty breeders, and the Vatican encourages them not to stop.

25 thoughts on “Dishwasher moon”

  1. I remember the cowboy. Never really got to know him but had an interesting appearance. Used to see him in the plaza grande, and he always eyed me with curiosity and what I interpreted was a little hostility. Maybe that is why I never got to know him.

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    1. Memo: Al Kinnison was an absolutely wonderful guy, the kind of father I wish I had had. He was 19 years older than me, so he could have been my father. Your seeing him as potentially hostile on the plaza was an error. He and his wife, Jean, who died about a year before him, were famous for roping in tourists on the plaza and taking them home for coffee or whatever. They were extremely outgoing. That said, he did not suffer fools well, to put it mildly. Perhaps he had just run into a fool when you saw him walking there on the plaza.

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      1. I think he had just lost his wife. If I remember correctly, he had some randy comments about their relationship! Wish I had known him.

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    1. Andrés: Thanks. Those tiles are the roof over a part of what I call the Garden Patio. It’s out back, and it’s where I store yard tools. I did not take the photo from the kitchen due to the window. I went out to the Garden Patio and hoisted myself up a bit on a ladder.

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  2. Nice pictures.
    I agree wholeheartedly on the dishes discussion. I had a roommate in college who was not “decent people.” He was gone by the end of the semester.

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    1. Patzman: I fear I have been a challenge and often a frustration to each of my legion of wives. I am the textbook example of “neat freak,” which is to say well-organized. That’s different from having a cleanliness obsession. I can live with some dust, etc., but things have to be in their proper places. Just makes life easier.

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      1. I am just the opposite (surprise! surprise!). I don’t mind a bit of clutter but like things nice and clean. If the dishes aren’t to be washed immediately, at least rinsed off and stacked.

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        1. Clete: Rinsed off and stacked sits somewhere between the ideal of washing them immediately and the disgusting, work-creating habit of just tossing them into the sink for later. Your technique proves you are not a terrible person, but it also falls way short of perfection. I pray that with time you will improve yourself.

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          1. Well now, I suppose you feel it is polite to let dinner guests sit around while you wash the dishes? In our home the table will be cleared, the dishes rinsed and will be washed when they have left.

            Besides, perfection is boring. Life needs a little funk to make it interesting.

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  3. I have been a washer of dishes since forever. My daughter and son-in-law bought me a new stainless steel machine months ago, got tired of being asked if I’d installed it yet, so I did. Still haven’t used it yet though the lights come on and it looks pretty.

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    1. Bob: As you no doubt know, washing dishes by hand builds character, and if you do it immediately after eating — before the food dries on — you show great character.

      And that, my friend, is what the Goddess wants.

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  4. Here’s my take on washing dishes. I dislike it intensely. I have always thought it a boring, mindless, repetitious, soul-sucking chore. So the dishwasher helps me get the kitchen cleaned up and onto chores I enjoy more.

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    1. Judy: Since your view of dishwashing is so negative, I think an automatic dishwasher is the way to go. Actually, I find dishwashing quite fulfilling in an odd way.

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      1. I take an orderly, systematic approach to dishwashing. My wife likes to just get in there and engage with them. The Devil takes the hindmost.

        Saludos,
        Don Cuevas

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  5. If the Goddess had wanted dishes washed by hand she wouldn’t have invented dishwashers. Of course, pots and pans, and delicate get done by hand, but sometimes not until the next morning, but they get rinsed and sometimes have water in the bottom overnight. A pretty liberal approach, I think. We sit around singing Kumbaya too late to make the effort.

    I have a friend who only uses paper plates & plastic cutlery. Then they just contribute to the landfill.

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    1. Kris: The Goddess did not invent dishwashers because she loves personal industry and initiative. Dishwashers were invented by a cousin of Beelzebub. I thought everyone knew that. As for singing Kumbaya:

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        1. Kris: One doesn’t hear much from Joan Baez anymore. I imagine she’s getting rather long in the tooth. Maybe she’s in a nursing home. She could sing quite well and was a product of those tumultuous times. We were all lefties back then. I hope she saw the light, as I did, but I doubt it.

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  6. Interesting post. I like these little glimpses into your life. Who else could make a common household task interesting?

    Loved the Rachmaninoff Cowboy piece. I had missed it somehow. Sounds like a fellow I would have liked to meet.

    Need to spend some time over at at the “Pearls.”

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    1. Thanks, Ray. As for the cowboy, I loved that guy. Wish we had met earlier in life. As it was, I only met him about four years before he died. He was unique in the true sense of the word, one of a kind. His wedding present to us was a string of garlic to hand over the Hacienda’s front door to ward off evil spirits. It was a fun gift. He did not believe in evil spirits. No matter. It still hangs over the front door, and we’ve had no difficulties at all with evil spirits.

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