Possibilities

I’VE BEEN SINGLE — and I’ve been married. A lot.

Three times.

Being single doesn’t hold much appeal, and now that I’m considerably older, it holds even less.

Actually, I loathe being single. Maybe I subconsciously married someone 16 years my junior to virtually guarantee that I’ll sail off into the ether before she does.

She goes to the gym three evenings a week. During those times, when I walk through the bedroom, the above is what I see, and I imagine it as a permanent scene. Grim.

I prefer the photo below.

23 thoughts on “Possibilities”

    1. Carole: She likely does. Me, not so much. The similarities between me and my father are extreme. He kicked off unexpectedly at 75, just 2.5 years older than I am now. We’ll see. Meanwhile, I’m putting some things in order.

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      1. Make one of those things giving her my email address (or giving me hers), so I can offer my condolences when you pass. And make sure she has the password for your blog so she can post a proper death notice if nothing else. You will be missed when the time comes. May it be a long time yet.

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        1. Kim: Sounds like you’ve already got my grave dug.

          By the way, nobody does any “passing” around here. We die, and anyone else who dies also dies.

          Pass. Jeez, man. Yeah, I know it’s common. Way too common.

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  1. Genetics are relevant, of course. But based on a lot of your previous posts, it seems to me that you take much better care of your health than your father did. In my case, my dad died at 50 from a heart attack (all but two of his 10 siblings have died of heart attacks or strokes). I’m 55. I make regular trips to a cardiologist. He constantly preaches that I can’t do anything about my genetics, but I can reduce all the other risk factors. Seems like you do that to me.

    If I was a betting man, I’d wager you’re going to be around for a long time, my friend.

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    1. Ray: Fact is that many things we now know about health were unknown during my father’s lifetime. He ate poorly (loved desserts), but he did regular exercise all his life, and he was not overweight, ever.

      Yes, genetics matter. My father was only half of it. My mother never did any exercise she could avoid, smoked lightly most of her life, and lived to age 90.

      So, who knows? Time will tell. In the meantime, I’m having a great time, and will spend my 15th anniversary next month on the beach at Zihuatanejo.

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  2. Felipe: Your realistic attitude is wonderful. In my gene bank I have alcoholism, diabetes, heart issues and the list goes on … so far I have escaped two of those and the other is treatable at very little cost and time. Can’t live a late life of fear. Felipe, you seem to go out there and do what you like and or need to do. Just keep moving, my friend.

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    1. Peggy: Oh, I’m having a fine time, and I’m keeping up the moving fairly well. Good to hear you’ve escaped the results of much of your gene pool too. Let us keep our fingers crossed.

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  3. Putting things in order is pretty important at this stage of the program. I shudder at the idea of having my wife be saddled with all the stuff that needs to be handled upon my big sleep, so the last year or so it has been a process that hopefully will make life easier for her, the way she has done for me in the last few challenging years.

    We can only do what we can, to our ability, when someone brings up something about worrying about either exercise or other health issues. It reminds me of Jim Fixx who was the health fanatic in the ’70s who croaked at 52.

    You look a hell of a lot better than 75% of your compatriots I see around, so don’t worry about it too much, just enjoy.

    Happy Anniversary next month, enjoy the beach. We are shooting over there pretty soon also. Today happens to be our anniversary, 17 and joyous.

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    1. Tancho: Felíz anniversary to you. Seventeen years, not too far ahead of us. We were real smart to marry Latinas too.

      One can’t help but chuckle wickedly at Jim Fixx. So much running around, and then … kerplop!

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    2. The founder of the Atkins diet died at 72. I remember when it happened. He walked out of his front door, slipped and fell on his head and died. He might as well have eaten bread.

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      1. Bonnie: At least he did not die young.

        Don’t know why your comment went to the moderation pile. I did not do it. Perhaps you’re using a different email address. Almost anything will trigger it. Same goes for the other comment you left here. Who knows?

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  4. I have never been alone. Married almost 52 years and left roommates before that. The few times that my Husband has been gone overnight, I did not like it. I have friends that are widows and the size of their family makes a big difference. At the end of the day you are alone.

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    1. Beverly: Having a family to fall back on is important. Unfortunately, I don’t have that. Got lots of Mexican relatives now, but there is no real connection. I’m like a man from Mars to them.

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    2. Many people we met at Lake Chapala, when they began to have health concerns, returned to the USA to be closer to their kids and grandkids. The only ones who remain, it seems, are those who either do not have family or have difficult relationships. If I had known, when I was younger, what I know now, I would have had more children.

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  5. Stress is a big factor in disease and lifespan. You don’t seem to have much of it so I’d count on many more years.

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    1. Brent: Yep, that does appear to be correct. And if I’m stressed, it must be unconscious because it’s not up where I notice it. I sleep like a baby.

      The many more years, however, could be a mixed bag, or even a nasty bag. My mother lived to 90, but I sure would not want to spend my final years the way she did. You can live too long.

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  6. One never knows what tomorrow will bring. Get rid of your junk now. Do you want your family to sort through all of that? Those orphan socks will never find their mates. Those ragged underwears will never get mended. That Nehru jacket looked good in its time, but that has passed. Bell-bottom trousers will never come back into style. Out with the platform shoes.

    Burn those old love letters from someone that is long dead and that your family never knew existed. It is hard to part with old pictures of old loves, but it must be done. Leave your family with nothing but good memories and a lot of cash.

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    1. Señor Gill: Are you ever talking to the wrong Hacienda inhabitant. I save almost nothing. I toss relentlessly. My child bride, on the other hand, never tosses anything. If there is a female, Mexican equivalent of the Nehru jacket, you’ll find it in her closet somewhere. Furthermore, she often chides me for my rampant tossing.

      I do, however, have an old love letter or two from, well, someone else from 20 years ago, stuck in my file cabinet.

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      1. I was going to note that you had probably done most of that before moving to Mexico. At least if the two-suitcase story is true, which I believe it to be.

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