Pluses of the plague

500px-Plus_symbol.svgALL IS NOT bad in these days of the plague. There are pluses.

 

  1. We’re spending less money. Yes, staying at home means not going out to eat, something we usually do a lot, but rarely now. So, more cash in the bank.
  2. No more roadblocks on the highway between here and the capital city. There is a teachers college* in a small burg between here and there, and the students — radical, ignorant nincompoops one and all — regularly put roadblocks on the highway to solicit money to further the Revolution. I never give them a peso. But the CCP Virus has chased them away. Ha! Irony.
  3. Lower gasoline prices. Apparently, this has squat to do with the plague, but it happened almost simultaneously, so it seems connected. Gas prices in Mexico have plunged from about 20 pesos a liter to 14, a sizable savings. I think we can thank the Russkies and the Mohammedans for this.
  4. More together time with my child bride and her with me. This is mostly a plus, but we are getting on one another’s nerves now and then. In our 18 years we’ve never been together so often. She is cute, however.
  5. More posts on The Unseen Moon. This is a plus more for you than for me, but it’s a plus for me too in that it gives me something to do aside from watch YouTube videos and read books on my Kindle. I  also garden now and then. Weeds.
  6. A cleaner house. We have no domestics aside from Abel the Deadpan Yardman, but that’s just the yard. Inside the house, milady is the Queen of Cleaning. It’s not her best talent, but she does a decent job when she finds time free from her pastry business, which is kaput for now. So housecleaning is getting more attention. I do some too. I am very un-Mexican in that regard. Pass the broom.
  7. I’ve ceased to shave.

* * * *

* These are called “Normal” schools, but there’s nothing normal about them. It’s a chain of “teacher colleges” around the country, which has existed for decades. In reality, they are communist training camps replete with murals of Ché, which explains the radicalism of teacher unions in Mexico and also the appallingly low education level. Sad.

29 thoughts on “Pluses of the plague

  1. Not all of the normal schools are dens of iniquity and communism. Of course, the only ones that get any recognition are the minority that cause problems, going far beyond what Vasconcelos envisioned. The rest do serve an important role in preparing their alumni to make a living as teachers.

    Like

    1. Ms. Shoes: Well, if you say so, but I am skeptical. You have a far rosier view of the Mexican educational system than I do. I’m referring to public high school and below, not the private schools. Teacher unions are bad news anywhere, and even worse news in Mexico. The worst are famously violent.

      Like

  2. And my auto insurance company is promising me about a 33% rebate on my premium, due to the big reduction in auto accidents.

    Like

  3. Reduced driving due to the virus is definitely contributing to gas prices, and Saudi Arabia seems to be pushing even more oil into the markets. But an additional side benefit is cleaner air.

    Like

    1. Creigh: I always find the air here on my glorious mountaintop to be fresh. The only exception is springtime when the farmers burn the fields all over the place. Then we get quite a bit of ash falling on the Hacienda. I have to sweep it up on a regular basis.

      Like

  4. We went from 20 to 17 pesos and a lot less driving, groceries once a week in town and a few trips to the village. A lot of together time, mostly good, need to go to different rooms for a little alone time.

    More time trying different recipes for dinner. I’m liking that. Doing some yard work and home repairs that were not important before, but now I might as well get them done.

    I look forward to more posts on the Unseen Moon. Keep it up, please.

    We have a domestic, and two of her boys come over to do a few things around the house, and then we play some cards. We enjoy that very much. Gone to every third day shaving and not cutting my hair. Being a ward of the government now, that helps save me some money. Trying to learn something new every day.

    Like

    1. Kirk: We have a Backgammon board, but my wife doesn’t like board games. Cards either. She keeps busy knitting a sweater she started before the plague appeared. She keeps unraveling parts of it and starting over. It may go on forever. Women are goofy sometimes.

      Like

  5. Well, my wife ordered groceries to be delivered. The only thing that showed up so far was the pinto beans. There were only about 25 beans in the pack. It has been over two weeks, and no sign or the rest of the order.

    So, I ordered groceries from Wally World, but I could not get a delivery date. I chose the pickup option. We waited three days for our assigned pickup time. When we got there, we waited our turn, but the fellow could find no sign of our order. My groceries are probably laying there at some store in Billings, Montana, or Portland, Oregon.

    My wife had enough of this. She was masked and gloved up. She got in the six-foot-apart line to shop in the store. When she finally got in, most every thing was sold out. She did get us green onions and milk. There were very few fresh vegetables.

    It looks to me that what is being sold is stuff that was in warehouses. This is going to get really ugly when that is exhausted. My oldest son went to Costco this afternoon. They would only sell him one package of bacon, but they did sell him a five-pound bag of onions.

    I have a lot of dried food, but one has to be very hungry to eat it. I am afraid we might be there soon.

    Like

    1. Señor Gill: Is this the state to which the United States has fallen? Our supermarkets, Costco, whatever, are fully stocked. Maybe you should move down here. The Downtown Casita is available. A special price for Moon readers.

      I think Trump better get the U.S. rolling again.

      Like

      1. I suspect because this isolation policy was applied in a somewhat lackadaisical manner in Mexico that the supply chain was not interrupted as bad. It was a more as usual approach.

        Like

        1. Señor Gill: Yeah, in many places, things remain quite lackadaisical. In others, far less so. My sister-in-law went to the bank yesterday. The bank was letting only 10 people in at one time. The folks waiting outside just jammed themselves all together. Jeez.

          Starting today, for the next two weeks, our huge downtown plaza is cordoned off. No one is allowed in. Some municipal governments are more attentive. Others, not much.

          Like

  6. My wife bought gas today for $1.09 per gallon U.S. in NE Ohio. Some places were selling for less than $1.00 U.S. over the weekend.

    Like

  7. Beauty is everywhere. And things will get even better. The plague will move on or out or somewhere waiting for its next chance.

    Spoke with my sister a couple of days ago, across town. She is sure that folks here are getting crazy from the isolation. She’s wrong of course. The ones of whom she speaks were already crazy.

    Count your blessings (again).

    Like

  8. My home is very clean. I am finding that cleaning helps when I get restless with the whole quarantine thing. My cooking skills, which I allowed to atrophy over the years, are getting a workout. Heck, I even like my own cooking lately.

    Like

  9. Fanning the fires of paranoia. https://thehill.com/business-a-lobbying/business-a-lobbying/492625-food-supply-worries-grow-after-outbreak-closes

    Then known as Shuanghui Group, WH Group purchased Smithfield Foods in 2013 for $4.72 billion. It was the largest Chinese acquisition of an American company to date. The acquisition of Smithfield’s 146,000 acres of land made WH Group, headquartered in Luohe, Henan province, one of the largest overseas owners of American farmland.

    Like

      1. Sr. Z, I know you don’t like regulations, but would it be OK if we imposed a few health and safety regulations on Chinese firms in the US? And maybe even some minor environmental regs?

        Like

        1. Creigh: First off, I do like regulations. Quite a bit, in fact. But they must be good regulations and kept to a bare minimum. Giving bureaucrats full-time positions to endlessly make regulations, which is what happens when you put bureaucrats in such a position, a stream of unending regulations, is one of those recipes for disaster.

          As for the Chinamen, run them all out of the United States, I say. How’s that for a good regulation?

          Like

Comments are closed.