Nighttime & drainage

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Man in the dark.

I SHOT THE above using the camera on my Hewlett Packard All-in-One desktop PC just before beddy-bye the other night. Let’s file it under “Fun With Cameras.”

It was almost 10 p.m., and we had finished our supper salads seated in our recliners, one of which you can detect in the right of the photo, watching something on Netflix. My child bride had headed downstairs, leaving me to my mischief.


Unrelated to the above is the news that the wonderful, new and spacious drain hole has been constructed on the upstairs terraza. I mentioned that in an earlier post appropriately dubbed Adding a New Hole. The work was scheduled to start Monday, but the guys started Tuesday instead, after giving me a heads-up.

Most of the time when Mexican workers cannot show up when promised, they just don’t show up when promised, an annoying cultural habit. Maybe a day late or a week. Or never. But my guys are not like that. They’re reliable.

The ones who showed up Tuesday were Miguel and his son, also Miguel, who is about 12. At one point, Big Miguel was sweeping some trash as he told me that Little Miguel didn’t want to sweep because it’s “woman’s work.” I told the boy that sweeping is a useful skill, and a hour later I spotted him sweeping, so maybe I changed his life.

He’ll score a better wife now.

They did excellent work on my new drain, so I’m awaiting a downpour that must blow in from a specific direction so I can give it a test run. I am optimistic.

hole
One of two initial drain holes. Useless.
little
Child labor: Little Miguel chips away.
big
Adult labor: Big Miguel chips away too.
one
How it’s looking on the other side. The ceramic base is new.
outside
Covering up on the other side.
2
The new drain space from the inside. Way bigger.

26 thoughts on “Nighttime & drainage

    1. Ms. Shoes, P.S.: You cannot tell from the photo, but just below the shade is an artsy-fartsy gourd. I have a matching lamp downstairs. The gourd on it is twice the size. Lamps, as I imagine you know, are a funny issue in Mexico. Few people use anything but ceiling lights.

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  1. You’re right about the ceiling lights. The only floor lamps I’ve been able to locate have all been too flimsy, designed more for creating a decorative spot of light on the ceiling. I want mine for reading, probably next to my bed, because the floor lamp I’m now using, a very heavy brass one which my grandmother likely bought in the ’30s or ’40s, has rust spots on it and isn’t all that attractive.

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  2. Sweeping is a topic of mirth in my household. Omar cannot understand why I do not leave it to Dora. I think he is embarrassed when his friends see me doing some “womanly” chores. When I sweep out the garage, I always attract a group of three to four boys in the street who stand staring at me. One asked me about a month ago if my mother was sick.

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    1. Señor Cotton: My nephew downtown has no idea whatsoever how to wield a broom. Literally. It’s laughable. He possibly does not know if the straw part goes up or down. Of course, this failing and numerous others he lamentably possesses, is the fault of his mother.

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  3. The work on the deck looks good. As far as sweeping, our maid’s boys know how to sweep. Their mother doesn’t put up with that.

    We have a few bats around, but I don’t know where they hang out during the day.

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    1. Kirk: Maybe the bats are hiding in your roof tile … or maybe not. When I lived in Houston, I installed a bat house on a tree in the backyard. Sat there for years with no residents. Oh, well.

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      1. Felipe: Bats have specific likes and dislikes for their lodging. Warmth has lots to do with it even despite a hot and humid environment. Anything towards the sun or south side seems to please them.

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  4. You and those who comment upon your prose must be hanging around the wrong crowd again. My mozo sweeps whatever needs to be swept — and he does dishes, too. I didn’t know that he could clean stovetops and wash dishes until 15 years ago when his wife, my housekeeper, was on maternity leave, and he automatically took on those chores, saying those were his at-home chores as well.

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    1. Ms. Shoes: Your mozo? You have a waiter? I want a mozo too, and I want him to not only wait on me hand and foot but to sweep, wash dishes and clean the stovetop. That would be sweet.

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    1. Ms. Shoes: So it seems, but I checked on two translation programs — it’s not a word I use — and they both said just “waiter.”

      I’ll accept your word that it has a broader meaning.

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      1. Mozo is sort of a multi-purpose word. See https://www.wordreference.com/definicion/mozo and https://dle.rae.es/mozo. At https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mozo, noting “chiefly Southwest” has this among its definitions: a. a male hired to assist with household work or to attend to various small jobs or to do chiefly manual work of a usually somewhat heavy or menial kind: such as
        (1): a male servant : male domestic
        (2): HANDYMAN
        (3): a luggage porter
        (4): LABORER
        b: a waiter in a restaurant or other dining room

        Because I was concerned about whether the term could be demeaning, long ago and far away and even as recently as a couple of years ago, I sought counsel of respectable, educated Mexican folk who are very careful with their speech, and they uniformly advised that it was a polite term.

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  5. Sweeping is an honorable task for both sexes. My dad taught me to sweep because I was his outside helper. My sisters helped my mother with Saturday chores in the house; I helped dad with outdoor chores which sometimes including sweeping the garage or sweeping lawn cuttings on the patio. While I do believe in school, sometimes the best lessons are learned from our parents. I learned a lot about lawn mowers, tractors, boats, and yard work from “helping” my dad with chores on the weekend. I don’t recall that I was much of a helper in my early years. I did cut our large yard every week by the time I was in my teens. It took most of the morning. Working a bit with our parents is very good for building relationship with our parents, too. I will never forget the lessons of life I learned while sharpening lawn mower blades, or handing off screwdrivers and hammers, or even the long hours spent mowing.

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    1. Laurie: Sweeping is easy and something everyone can do. When my nephew who lives downtown was about 13, I offered to pay him to sweep the street behind our house. Money always appeals to him. Work, not so much. We went out back, and I handed him a broom, and started to walk back inside. I looked behind me, and it was like watching the Three Stooges all wrapped into one. He had no clue, and he was not trying to be humorous. He ended up doing a very half-assed job, but I paid him. But I’ve never hired him for manual labor since.

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    1. Ricardo: You’re a funny fellow. Enjoy your siesta. But it’s a lovely day here this morning. Big storm last night, and I figured I’d have my first opportunity to use my new drain hole on the terraza, but no. It was blowing from another direction. There was almost no water on the floor out there. The Goddess works in mysterious ways.

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  6. I have nothing against sweeping, but I recently bought a small leaf blower. For porches, patios, driveways and the like, it does a better job in a fraction of the time.

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    1. Creigh: But it makes so much racket. And I think one has to be a Mexican to use those things in the United States. You better check the law on that in order to avoid problems.

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      1. This one is a little cordless electric blower, not too noisy. And I can appreciate the aesthetics of an old-fashioned broom, but the thing is just so much faster and more effective.

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        1. Creigh: Oddly, in the 20 years I’ve lived in Mexico I don’t recall hearing a leaf blower of any type more than one, maybe two, times.

          Mexicans make racket in other ways.

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