Flying the flag

That little, brick room sits atop a house about a block away from us. I took the video while sitting in our upstairs veranda. The rains stopped falling, for the most part, weeks ago, and the mountains are already turning brown from thirst.

And the neighborhood dogs are barking as usual. You get used to it. And the music comes from a neighbor too. At least it’s soft. Maybe because it’s Sunday.

12 thoughts on “Flying the flag

    1. Señor Cotton: My take on all Mexican holidays, and many above the border too, is the lesser the better. In spite of that, the parade of cars into town yesterday was impressive. May it end soon. Be well.

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  1. Outside of the puente, how has tourism been so far at this early stage of the winter season? Many gringos arriving yet? What types of restrictions for covid are in effect?

    On another subject, when is the foggiest time of year in your area?

    Gracias de antemano.

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    1. Antonio: In contrast to other areas of Mexico — primarily coastal, I think — we aren’t much of a snowbird destination. Lots, perhaps most, of those folks are Canadians looking for somewhere warm. They go to the beach.

      As for the Kung Flu, the government — both state and municipal — makes lots of pronouncements and rules, but most are just ignored. In the early months of this problem, people stayed home more, but now, it seems, life is pretty much back to normal. There are signs at the entrance to most businesses saying you cannot come in without a mask. I think the government makes them do that, more than anything. Some businesses have been shut temporarily by the government because they were not toeing the line.

      Foggiest time of the year? Got no clue. I am sure there is one, but it never registers in my feeble mind specifically when. I just go with the flow, foggy or otherwise. It was very foggy yesterday morning, but not this morning.

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  2. That is surprising! I have only visited your area in the summer months and it was usually void of many tourists except on weekends while we were there and the few then were paisanos. I would have expected an influx of foreign tourism during the winter months just because that is when more of them visit Mexico in general. I know that other places away from the beaches such as Oaxaca, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Guanajuato or San Miguel de Allende certainly see a big increase in foreigners during those months. We always made it a point to visit during slow times to avoid crowds in restaurants or museums, etc. ,but now that we are retired we get restless staying home and like to make short trips around the country. Nice to know that Pátzcuaro is relatively quiet in January or February.

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    1. Antonio: The tourist trade around here is overwhelmingly Mexican. Don’t know why we haven’t become more popular with the Gringo tourist crowd, but I am very thankful for it. Let them continue to visit San Miguel, Guanajuato, Oaxaca, etc., not here.

      But the number of Gringos who live here increases every year, I think. When I moved here 20 years ago, there were about 40 of us. Now there are 10 times more at least. I’d like to call a halt to that, but nobody asks me.

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      1. All you need to do is to start writing more about gang/cartel activity in your neck of the woods. Make sure you post the name of your town and a few other key words. Be sure to include some particularly gory stories. Then Gringos searching for places to retire will come upon your tales of danger and will promptly conclude that they’d really rather live in Ajijic or SMA anyway.

        Saludos,

        Kim G
        Boston, MA
        Where we live in fear of a BLM riot.

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        1. Kim: Not such a bad idea. However, I never mention the name of my town here, a custom I started years ago. Same for the nearby state capital. I have my quirks. I remember way back when, my town had the reputation of being very cold in the winter, which it often is, something most Gringo, and especially Canuck, retirees did not find appealing. I use to heartily promote that notion, but it doesn’t seem to possess the power it once did. They keep on coming.

          We have no BLM riots here, of course.

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          1. The idea that it’s ever cold where you live is laughable to anyone from Canada, and to anyone in the USA who lives outside the Sunbelt. You only think it’s cold because you spent your life in the torrid parts of the USA. Believe me, the occasional frost doesn’t count as “cold” to someone from Boston, Cleveland, Chicago, Kansas City, etc. So I’d say that the “cold” angle is only going to work on maybe a third of Gringos, maybe even fewer. And I’m sure there’s plenty of folks like me who have every desire of avoiding places that are too hot. The idea that it’s even possible to be cold in Mexico might even be attractive to a certain set of people. Heck, we even know one who oddly enough moved to a Mexican beach that’s by any reasonable standard way too hot for him.

            As for your secrecy, I can understand it to a point. Certainly leaving your barrio with the unpronounceable name unspoken makes sense. But the larger city that it’s now part of? What? You think someone is somehow going to stalk you? It’s quite unlikely. Besides, you’ve probably already said too much anyway. You’ve posted pictures of the plaza, so some nut job could probably figure out where that is. Then it’d only be a matter of asking around about the tall, older gringo, and they’d find you in no time. You know you can enter a picture’s URL into google search and it’ll return similar pictures which are likely labeled with place, right?

            So, no. I think you need to focus on violence, the potential for violence, maybe add a dose of corruption, and top it all off with the impossibility of buying good, foreign food. Sorry, no good pizza, pasta, nor linzer tortes; only tacos, enchiladas, and guisado. Off to Ajijic with you!

            Saludos,

            Kim G
            Boston, MA
            Where there’s a dearth of good Mexican food.

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