Sunday at the cemetery

Lots of folks have seen cemetery photos from Mexico’s famous Day of the Dead, but far less seen are those same places photographed a month later when the pizazz has worn off, and the mourners have moved on. We took a Sunday drive and passed the graveyard in the picturesquely named village of Cucuchucho.

We parked the Honda by the cemetery’s front gate and found it unlocked.

14 thoughts on “Sunday at the cemetery

    1. Carole: When you die, your worldly responsibilities come to an end. Cemetery maintenance, to my way of thinking, is the responsibility of those still breathing. They’re doing a lousy job of it.

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  1. Those were not mourners, amigo Felipe, they were celebrants! And a good celebration always leaves a good mess! In reality, individual grave maintenance is for the families of the dead. The areas surrounding the graves in civil cemeteries are usually maintained by the municipality or sometimes ejidos will take responsibility. The dead flowers and dried fruits will disappear over time. Back to the soil like every other living thing. The plastic and tins,of course, will not. But in poorer municipalities, neglect is common.

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    1. Antonio: You hit the proverbial nail on the head with the last sentence. Neglect is common. The cemetery in question was a real mess, and it’s not one of those on the usual tourist trail hereabouts either.

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    1. Leisa: We’ve never done that other than yesterday, which was a month after the big night. I did watch my step due to not wanting to walk right across a grave, which would have been easy to do. Some were just slightly high mounds of dirt.

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      1. The important precaution is not stepping into an open grave. Many times they stack deceased family members one upon the other and if there is just one buried, which is a lot of graves, the tomb is left uncovered.

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        1. Antonio: You’re a funny fellow. I should not step into an open grave? Reminds me of the downtown cemetery here where I live. We go there in the morning following the Big Night each year to tidy up my wife’s brother’s grave. The graves are packed so tightly together that nothing is done there on the Big Night because there simply is no room for it. Well, anyway, for years there has been an open grave next to my brother-in-law’s. It’s fun to look into, but I sure would not want to fall down there. It’s deep. And spooky.

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  2. I suppose the detritus is simply a reminder that death is merely another phase of life. Or maybe it is the realization that our lives are just one, long suicide note.

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  3. A week ago the graveyard across the highway had some families in doing a subdued service. There was a great trumpet player there for two hours.

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      1. Ah, mi amigo, Felipe! Of course, there could have been a trumpet player at a Mexican funeral! La despedida con mariachi has been a tradition here long before the sound of a jazz trumpet accompanied mourners in New Orleans. As you said before, in all your years here, you really haven’t paid much attention to our culture.

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