Kung flu days

My child bride was sitting on the bedroom love seat this afternoon when I snapped this shot. She was crocheting an elephant, which is one method of passing time during the interminable Kung Flu days. Maybe I should crochet.

We’re told the Kung Flu is worsening in our area, but at the same time a federal government website has my mountaintop in Code Yellow, which is one below Code Orange and two below Code Red. We were in Code Orange for a good spell.

The state government has ordered all nonessential businesses to close on Sundays and at 7 p.m. weekdays, and that’s been going on for two weeks now. I don’t think that serves any useful purpose aside from causing economic problems for people.

I favor the Swedish approach and that of South Dakota.

A more efficient method would be to convince Mexicans to not hug and kiss each other relentlessly, an inconvenient aspect of Latino culture they simply cannot stop doing, come hell or high water, as the saying goes.

Recent news also claims our local government hospital, the one that treats serious Kung Flu patients, is at 100 percent capacity, and the above-mentioned government website says we now have a total of 10 folks hospitalized. Is 10 folks all we can manage?

Our town’s population is about 98,000, so 10 in the hospital sounds like good odds. We also have eight “suspicious” cases, the website reports. We’ve also had 1,324 confirmed cases of which 1,219 have recuperated. Again, I like those odds, which is why I don’t wear a mask when I run around town unless I’m obligated to, normally to enter a business.

We took our daily walk around the neighborhood plaza this morning. She wore a mask, and I did not because were in the open air and nobody was anywhere near us.

It would be like wearing a mask while driving alone in your car. Only a nut does that.

17 thoughts on “Kung flu days

  1. Economic hardships are only going to get worse. I was having lunch today, and the waiter was wondering what was going to happen to him and his family as most of his kids and grandchildren where now living with him with another on the way, and the restaurant was empty.

    We wear our masks when we have to as most people do, but then people take their mask off when they greet someone. Governments think if they keep telling people the sky is falling it will right the ship, but it’s been a year of the same message and nothing has really changed. When you hear that restaurants and bars can now start opening in Liberal states, but the only thing that has changed is Sleepy Joe is in charge. Even some Dems start to question the message.

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  2. “Only a nut does that.”

    I frequently see solo car drivers masked up as if their next stop was the Wells Fargo stage coach. Almost always northerners. They remind me of the over-worried young men in the 1980s who were afraid they could contract AIDS from themselves.

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    1. Señor Cotton: I read a humorous observation from above the border some while back. If you see someone driving alone and masked, it was like a Biden bumper sticker.

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    2. I agree that no one needs a mask while driving alone. But, if you are shopping and going from one store to another that’s not far away, it can be easier to just leave the mask on, rather than taking it off and then putting it back on again. I’ve even done this myself.

      So don’t judge the mask-wearing drivers too harshly. You have no idea whether they’re about to arrive at their next destination or not.

      Saludos,

      Kim G
      Boston, MA
      Where we suffer the glares of masked pedestrians as we walk around the neighborhood unmasked.

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  3. Well, I wish you luck with that. I read somewhere that the virus is also spread through the expulsion of intestinal gas. If you smell it, you might be exposed. Yes, there are truly killer farts. Good luck!

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  4. I have a neighbor, an 81-year-old Irish woman. She has had a lot of health problems including kidney problems and a host of others. I frankly don’t know the whole of it because she can’t tell me about being driven to the hospital without first telling me the life story of the guy driving her. But what I was able to figure out from chatting with her the other day is this. She was diagnosed with Covid in mid-December. They sent her home, where she recovered on her own. As far as I can tell, she’s someone who we’d all expect to have died — elderly, in poor health, etc — but she survived.

    Around the same time, half of my neighbors also got Covid. One, a guy a couple years younger than me, ended up in the hospital for about eight days. But he weighs somewhere around 300 pounds, has asthma, and to put it kindly, isn’t exactly a health nut. His wife and son had mild illness and have fully recovered. Actually, he too seems to have fully recovered.

    Another neighbor who’s between 65 and 70, as far as I can tell, also got it, along with his 19 y/o son. He said he felt pretty bad for about 15 days, but now feels fine. Son says it wasn’t too bad, but he says his lungs still feel irritated when he plays hockey or does other sports, but otherwise OK.

    So sure, many folks are dying, but most are not. The more I read, the more that I believe that most folks in decent health will get through this. Sure, there are cases of seemingly young, healthy folk who die, but those appear to be a tiny minority.

    While I’d recommend that you continue to avoid this as much as you can, I frankly wouldn’t be too surprised if you managed to survive it with little problem either.

    The fear and panic being sold on Covid appear to be far in excess of the reality. And that reality is that there are a lot of very old, very sick or weak people for whom this disease is fatal. For the rest of us? Not so bad.

    Saludos,

    Kim G
    Boston, MA
    Where we hugged six people on Christmas who all were infected with Covid that day and yet we weren’t. Go figure.

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    1. Kim: You hugged six people with the Kung Flu?! I’m assuming they did not know at the time. If they did know, shame on them.

      Glad you’re still good, but don’t try to hug me. I ain’t hugging nobody but my wife.

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          1. Why? If anything I’ve proven it doesn’t transmit covid. Really, I should hug more! It’s an expression of humanity and love, which we all need more of now.

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              1. I was in that house for less than 5 minutes as I had another commitment. To get covid, you need more than transient exposure. Which is why La Señora would be fine selling pastries on the street if she so chose.

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  5. A Russian vaccine is going to be purchased by Mexico fo COVID-19 prevention. Called Sputnik V. Queue up!

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