The blueprints

casa

HERE IS THE “blueprint” for the construction of the Hacienda. It was drawn by me back in 2002. I’m no architect, obviously.

It’s on standard graph paper. It’s the ground floor. For some reason, I did not save the plan for the second floor, but I do have one for the window designs, which I did, and another for the electrical schematic.

I used to be an electrician. Did you know that?

The only changes to the downstairs plan are that the stairwell to the left of the sala (living room) could not go directly up. It had to hang a right up top and continue, a question of physics, and we extended the recamara (bedroom) about a yard farther to the right to make it roomier.

The second floor is one huge space, a fireplace, a walk-in closet and a bathroom with shower stall. The upstairs terraza covers the downstairs bedroom, closet, hall and bathroom, the same fat L-shape.

The second floor extends from the stairwell all the way to the right. The downstairs terraza and the kitchen/dining room (cocina/comedor) have no second floor above.

The “patio de servicio” at the top left is open to sun and rain. That’s where you’ll find the propane tank, the washing machine and the clothesline. At the very top left you’ll see a bathroom. It only has a toilet, and it was there when we bought the property, a brick outhouse. We just left it in place. It’s now a storeroom with a never-used johnny.

The living room is slightly sunken, my wife’s idea. There is one step up to the dining room/kitchen and a step up to the pasillo (hallway) at the right. Both of these have a stone archway above, which is snazzy.

The design below is the downstairs terraza, side view, drawn by my wife who used to be a civil engineer. Did you know that?

Click on either drawing for a closer look.

Before the three albañiles (bricklayers but far more) and the helper began work in August of 2002, we got a permit from City Hall, and that was the end of that. No one ever came to check the work. Construction lasted nine months and cost just under $100,000.

We moved here in May of 2003.

The photo at the very bottom was taken around 2006, I’m guessing. You would be looking at the top diagram from the right. See that baby palm at the bottom left? It’s now about 18- to 20-feet tall.

The only drawback to being our own architects is that the living room could use more light. The windows facing the downstairs terraza are huge, but the downstairs terraza is wide and roofed, so little light enters through those windows. An architect would have seen that coming.

No matter. It’s why Edison invented light bulbs.

And, as always, tons of photos can be found here.

terraza

casa

The storefront, cont’d

Trench for one of two new walls.
Trench for one of two new walls.

THE LADS started work on the storefront Monday morning, and they’ve arrived here daily at 8 a.m. Much progress has been made. Above is a foundation trench for one of the two additional walls that will box in the area that currently is walled on just two sides. The trench has been half-filled with cement. It’s drying.

Below is the excavation for the foundation of the half-bath that will abut the storefront. The bathroom, a john actually because there will be no bathing there, no shower, will be the only part that will reside outside the already existing tile roof. The john will have a flat roof and the water tank will sit up there.

Excavation for half-bath’s foundation.

There are some unrelated details around the Hacienda that the boys will complete too. One is to remove that brick grill you see in the bottom photo. It was here when we bought the property 13 years ago, and we’ve never used it. Another is to replace the red tile roof above the green gate (top photo). That’s almost completed. Fast work.

That roof over the entrance gate was installed just last spring by a different workman. He did a crappy job, and tiles easily slipped this way and that. The new guys are cementing them in place.

In the top photo, you can see an old-style fuse box high on the wall just under what will be the storefront roof. Two metal conduits are leading to it. There are only two fuses in there, and it’s where the Hacienda electricity comes in from the street pole. That will be replaced with circuit breakers and moved somewhere to the right, which is to say outside the storefront.

An ongoing photo album of the work can be seen here. It will be updated often until the work is finished.

Watching this is great fun for me. If only I didn’t have to pay for it.

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(Note: The previous, original post on this matter is here.)