Healthcare options

This video from PragerU offers good advice on at least beginning to get the American healthcare system in order. I offer it to you as a public service.

The Unseen Moon is all about caring.

PragerU videos, usually about five minutes long, are often blocked by leftist YouTube censors because, one supposes, they are a danger to Western Civilization even though Dennis Prager is a practicing, conservative Jew. One video that YouTube banned was on the Ten Commandments. Go figger. If you are a practicing Christian or Jew, and you vote for the Democrat Socialist Party, it’s time for serious introspection.


When I worked on the Houston Chronicle, I had health insurance supplied through the job. It was no big deal. When I made a doctor or dental visit, I supplied my info to the receptionist and, at times, paid a small deductible, and that was the end of it.

Simpler times from over two decades ago.

When I retired on December 19, 1999, the coverage continued for the four weeks I remained in the United States before it faded away. It was a grace period that gave me time to find other coverage, but I did not bother.

When I landed in Mexico, I had no health insurance, and I gave it little thought because I was busy with other things, a new life. I lived in the state capital for eight months before moving up the mountainside. I had been brainwashed in the United States into thinking living without medical coverage was nuts, so I enrolled in government healthcare, a system known by its initials IMSS. I paid for one year. It was dirt cheap by U.S. standards.

But you have to use IMSS facilities, and I noticed in that year that the mountaintop IMSS clinic was neither a place I would want to be hospitalized nor a facility I would visit for doctor appointments. There were lines.*

For the rare doctor visit during that first year, I utilized the private sector and was very pleased. When the IMSS coverage expired, I did not renew. I never used IMSS even once. Oddly, I used it just last month for a free flu shot because my regular source at Star Medica in the state capital did not have the vaccine this year, a first.

Blame the Kung Flu hysteria.

I have been without health insurance for the past 20 years if you don’t count our enrolling in a free government plan for about three years, something I did just to provide my wife with peace of mind. We never used it either, and our doofus Mexican president has ended it, promising to replace it with something better, but that hasn’t happened.

Shortly after taking office two years ago, he promised a great government healthcare system “like Canada’s.” Thank God, like so many of his promises, he never followed through. Doofuses are like that, you know.

If I have a medical problem, I make a next-day, or even the same day, appointment at one of a number of excellent options here on the mountaintop or at the nearby state capital. I pay out of pocket. Most excellent doctors, dentists and even specialists here charge the peso equivalent of about $35 for a consult that can include minor procedures.

You need an X-ray? Just walk into a laboratory, get it done on the spot, and pay about $12. The privately owned labs also do blood work and similar stuff.

The video demonstrates well the problem with healthcare coverage above the border. I am so glad I don’t live up there anymore for that and plenty of other reasons.


* Our mountaintop IMSS clinic was given a major upgrade three or four years ago, and it’s far better now.

Canuck tells the truth

CANADA HAS socialized medicine. It works well at times and at other times, it does not. Leftist Americans are fond of pointing to Canada as something to be copied, healthcare-wise. Those same people enjoy citing Sweden’s “democratic socialism” as worthy of imitation. Bernie Sanders is one of those people. He is a dim bulb.

I have addressed Sweden at least twice in the past. The first time was in 2016 when the disastrous effects of open borders was addressed. That is worth revisiting. More recently, I looked at Swedish socialism, which is a myth. You can revisit that right here.

Open borders has been a disaster for Sweden, and their socialism doesn’t exist. They did give it a relatively brief try years back till they realized their error and corrected it.

But today’s topic is healthcare, specifically Canada’s. The Canucks have one sort of problem with healthcare, and the United States has another.

As I’ve mentioned often, Mexico’s healthcare system is the superior of the three. We have a government-run system, which serves poor folks fairly well, and we  have a private system, which is excellent, but you must pay, but not nearly what you pay above the border. Our government system has worsened since the nincompoop, populist president who goes by AMLO took office 16 months ago.

And quite a few lower-income Mexicans use the private system. That’s how inexpensive it is, thanks to competitive capitalism.

AMLO vowed to give us a system like Canada’s. But what he’s given us so far is a worse government system. The private system still works nicely, however.

The X-ray routine

med

WE USUALLY get chest X-rays once a year. It’s easy to do and cheap to boot.

This is where we do it. You need neither a doctor’s referral nor an appointment. You just go inside and request it. It can be a bit crowded in the morning, so we always show up after 5 p.m. when there is little chance of waiting.

The place is open till 8 p.m.

You tell the receptionist what you want, pay 250 pesos (about $13 U.S. nowadays), wait a few minutes and get ushered into the X-ray room. The technician does his thing, and you return to the waiting room for a brief sit.

Ten minutes later, you get the results that have been interpreted by a radiologist. Yep, for that $13, you get not only the X-ray, but a doctor who tells you what it shows.

Our relatively new socialist president, he who shall go unnamed, has said he’s gonna give us a healthcare system like Canada’s, i.e. “free.” Let us pray not.

And we sure don’t want the type of system that plagues Americans.

We both got X-rays on Thursday, and we are free of problems. Good to go.

Nincompoop democracy

OUR PRESIDENT-ELECT, a fellow best known by his initials, AMLO, and who takes office in about a week, won in a landslide* on July 1. I did not vote for him.

copy6-1307210385-free-stuff2He is a “man of the people,” which is why so many people voted for him. He crushed the opposition on his third run for the presidency. He came close the other times.

Like Bernie Sanders above the Rio Bravo, AMLO is fond of promising “free stuff.” He’s promised free healthcare like “they have in Canada,” even though the Mexican healthcare system is already excellent and offers various low-cost or free options to anyone who wants to sign up for them.

He wants to give all students scholarships and all graduates employment. This sounds swell, of course, if you disregard the matter of who’s paying for the largess.

How do you promise jobs? You can’t unless you make everyone a bureaucrat.

One of his worst ideas is putting major economic plans to a plebiscite. This has already happened at least twice around the country even though AMLO still is not president.

* * * *

Don’t underestimate ignoramuses

“The people know best,” he opines, though they rarely do, of course. “The people” usually are ignoramuses.

The first plebiscite took place quickly after his election win.

The topic was the new Mexico City airport, which is sorely needed due to the current one’s having long since outgrown its britches. The new airport is already partially done, and was scheduled to open in 2020.

“The people,” in all their brilliance, voted against it. Wiser minds in the business community called the plebiscite “Mickey Mouse” and illegal. How this will play out remains to be seen.

Just this week, a senator in the president-elect’s Morena Party presented a bill that would require mining companies to get permission of indigenous people before opening mining operations. Common sense says indigenous people will always say no to such a thing unless a huge payoff is included.

Stocks in Mexico’s two major mining firms plummeted, a loss of $1.6 billion U.S.

Earlier this month, the Morena Party proposed another law to curb bank fees. That sent bank stocks into a nosedive, and it took much of the Mexican stock market with it.

Mexico’s economic growth prospects are looking questionable, thanks to AMLO. But not to worry! We’re gonna give all students scholarships and guaranteed jobs on graduation. And free healthcare all around, just like Canada!

And AMLO has not even been inaugurated yet. By the way,  he’s invited Venezuelan despot Nicolás Maduro to the festivities.

ALMO is telling those invasion caravans from Central America who are passing through Mexico to stay here. He’ll give them jobs too! Latino solidarity, one supposes.

The mind reels.

* * * *

Felipe voices his opinion

I voted in a plebiscite on Saturday, which I happened upon by chance on our main plaza. There was a table with two ladies, ballots and a box to drop them into.

I flashed my voter identification card, in color, with photo, something Mexico requires to vote, as should all nations.

I opined on various topics. A Yucatan tourist train, yes. Doubling pensions for people over 68, yes.  (I’m way over 68!) Scholarships to everyone, no. Free healthcare to everyone, no. Some other stuff, mostly yes to my surprise.

* * * *

Hold onto your sombreros!

AMLO takes office Dec. 1, and the term lasts for six years. No re-election is allowed, but since the Morena Party is the majority, they could change that. I’m sure AMLO would love it just as much as he loves himself, which he surely does.

* * * *

* Universal suffrage is a dreadful idea. Only certain segments of the population should have the right to vote. There should be educational limits. No one without a high school degree should be able to vote. Voters should be property owners too.