Full circle to Chrome

board

I AM VERY ideological, and I give moral, sometimes even financial, support to the good folks who share my sharp view of things.

An organization that does not share my sharp view, to state it mildly, is Google, which is a cauldron of leftist and PC — redundancy, I know — nonsense, and they wear their views right out in the open, shamelessly.

To this end, I try to steer my tiny corner of cyberspace away from Google to the extent it is possible to do so, which sometimes it is not.

Alas, Google owns YouTube, which I love.

I do not use Google Search, and I do not say or write “Google something.” I say “internet search,” and I use one of the many fine alternatives.

Years ago, when Google debuted Gmail, I was one of the first to sign on, and Gmail was my primary email for a long time. Google did not appear so blatantly leftist in those days, and perhaps I was a tad calmer too. That was before the Western World turned into the sorry thing it is today.

About three years ago, wanting to dump Gmail, I went on an email safari, and found Fastmail, an excellent, inexpensive, paid service from Australia.

At the same time, I was using Google’s Chrome browser, but a year or so later I dumped it too, for ideological reasons, and I’ve tested and used a number of alternatives like Opera, Maxthon, Vivaldi, Brave, Sea Monkey and Pale Moon.

I also used Firefox for a long time in the distant past before switching to Chrome. Buggy Firefox has gone downhill if you didn’t know.

The best of the above-mentioned lot is Opera, which consistently gets high marks from people who know about such stuff. I used Opera until recently. It has a few things I dislike, mostly its Bookmark design.

On a lark a few days ago, I downloaded Chrome to take a look. Damn, but it’s good! So I’m back. I’ve gone full circle. Sometimes comfort trumps ideology.

In any event, a good number of the other browsers appear to be built on a Chrome foundation, so why not go to the source?

But I still don’t use Gmail, but if you send something to my Gmail address, it will be forwarded to Fastmail.

Don’t be a stranger.

A waning day

YOU MAY have noticed that there is a new banner photo at the top of The Moon. Here’s the entire shot.

Again.

For a few years there was part of a typewriter up there. I thought it appropriate, but I wearied of it.

Typewriters were my weapon during 30 years in the newspaper business. I started in 1969 with a black-iron Remington, or maybe it was a Royal. Then there were IBM Selectrics and, later, computer keyboards came along.

The new photo is mine. I shot it a few months ago in the late afternoon as sun was setting downtown.

I was standing on the main plaza. Our mountaintop town is a nice place to live, and it’s a far spell from Houston.

But Houston likely has more Mexicans.

The evening wall

walll

AS I STEPPED through the Hacienda’s steel door from the street yesterday evening, I spotted this.

The day was fading, and the sky was gray. It was about to rain, which it should not do in mid-November because it’s simply not right. We’ve had enough by now.

Speaking of water, I was returning from paying our water bill, which I do every four months. Most people pay monthly, but I pay four months at a whack just for convenience.

The water office is a block and a half away in a corner building on the plaza. The building is likely about four centuries old. The office is only open the last two weeks of each month.

A woman waits in there at a paint-flaking desk where sits a computer. I don’t know what the computer is for because she does everything by hand on sheets of paper.

The monthly charge for municipal water is 50 pesos, which is about $2.50 U.S. bucks these days. Water usage is not metered. It’s a flat rate for everyone.

And it’s the honor system. Nobody gets a bill.

The woman writes a receipt by hand from a receipt book she likely purchased in a stationary store. I leave 200 pesos for the four months, walk out the door and head home.

Opening the steel door to the Hacienda, I look up at the Alamo Wall, the monkey and the swan. It’s a nice evening in spite of the threatening rain, which did fall later.

The other anniversary

2003
Just after moving in, 2003. Sidewalks were added a year later.
2016
Photo taken yesterday, 2016.

I RECENTLY WROTE of our 14th wedding anniversary in a post titled The Age of Dust. But another annual milestone passed about the same time, the Hacienda’s 13th birthday.

cakeThese events touch on two things I am very proud of: my wife and my home.

Call me old-fashioned.

We got married in April of 2002. Within four months, we had purchased the double lot in an outlying, hardscrabble neighborhood of our mountaintop town, and begun construction based on plans we drew on graph paper.

The work, done by three craftsmen and a helper, lasted nine months. I shot scads of photos, all of which were lost when my computer hard drive committed suicide. Dang!

Thirteen years now, and the place has developed a patina.

And so have I. And that reminds me of another thing I’m proud of, in addition to my wife and home:

I haven’t dropped dead yet.