A summer deluge

Video was shot yesterday afternoon.

—–

Those canvas curtains come down in early June when the monsoon season starts, and they roll up in November, which is about when the world dries up in those parts.

This is our third summer under the new terraza roof which included those canvas curtains to avoid as much rainwater during the daily downpours as possible. We left one side open because we didn’t want to be totally enclosed for five or six months a year. If the rain blows from that direction, we just have to deal with it.

The clear section in the curtains was entirely transparent until a hailstorm last year blew one of them out, shredding it entirely. The sun damage after only one year had rotted it significantly. We called Nico, the guy who sold and installed the curtains, and he replaced those center sections with tougher material, which is not transparent, but it still lets light in.

Our fingers are crossed that this will hold up longer, especially since Nico, it appears, was one of the many business casualties of the Kung Flu hysteria. His establishment downtown has been gone for months. However, there is a good chance he now operates out of his home. I have his phone number.

A July report

Looking along the Alamo Wall on this drizzly morning.

—–

The Mexican mail system is famous for its pokiness, but today takes the cake. I did my biweekly run to the post office this morning to check my box, and there was a letter from Hearst pensions. It was dated back in January. I’ve had mail take a month or two on rare occasion but never six months. Stamped on the envelope was this message:

Missent to Malaysia.

Now that was quite a detour. I wish I could have gone along for the ride. But I don’t think Mexico did it. I think the Gringos were at fault. Mexico, Malaysia, it all looks the same to them.

Luckily, the Hearst envelope contained nothing of significance. But Social Security sends recipients who live outside the United States a yearly letter we must sign and return to prove we’re still alive.

The Social Security letter was not sent last year because of the Kung Flu. I imagine all those civil servants were at home, smiling, while their salaries were direct-deposited to their banks and they were out back grilling burgers on the barbie. So far the letter has not come this year either. It normally arrives in May or June.

Government employees must be loving the Kung Flu hysteria. Endless paid vacations. There’s a reason that governments almost everywhere are promoting Kung Flu. It’s manna from heaven.

If you work for the government.

—–

An annual appearance.

We’re hard into the rainy season now. The grass is green, and flowers are blooming. This morning, as I raised the curtain in the bedroom, I spotted a black-vented oriole perched on a red-hot poker plant.

And the hummingbirds are happy. This yellow flower comes from a bulb that hides underground most of the year, but it pops up a blooming plant annually about now to greet the rainfall.

Another plus to the daily rains is that it fills the galvanized tub from a rooftop drainpipe, and I just have to dip the watering can in there, easy peasy, as they say. You get your little pleasures where you can.

The watering can delivers drinks to the potted plants that live beneath the roof of the downstairs terraza.

It was drizzling when I drove to the post office around 9 a.m., and I wondered if Abel the Deadpan Yardman would show up today for the weekly mowing. As I write this at almost 11, he’s a no-show, and it’s not drizzling anymore. If he doesn’t come today, he’ll come tomorrow. He’s quite reliable, and he likes money, as we all do.

The ever-full tub of summer with water for the terraza plants.

Singapore is smart

When the Kung Flu was flung upon the world stage about March of last year, I was concerned. Everyone was concerned. It was being hyped almost as the Black Plague. Stay home, governments hollered via their pals in the news media, or you’ll die. My child bride and I obeyed and stayed home except for shopping.

I bet you did the same.

A couple of months later, I noticed the streets were not lined with corpses, plus I knew no one who had died or even caught the Kung Flu. Phooey with this, I told myself, and we went out and about, starting May 10, doing what we normally did, but often with masks, and maintaining that distance thing.

Time passed, and I paid attention to the news, not so much the mainstream (government) media, but other information sources that seemed more realistic and honest. I became less and less concerned about the Kung Flu. These days I wear no mask except to enter the occasional store where it’s required. I do not do “social distance.”

There is a Mexican government website that keeps track of Kung Flu cases in virtually every nook and cranny of Mexico. I’ve been watching it since last year. To date, about 1.65 percent of my town’s population has been infected in some way, which is to say over 98 percent of our 98,000 population has not caught Kung Flu. Of the minuscule proportion that has, almost all would have recovered at home in bed with Tylenol or something similar.

Comparatively small percentages exist almost everywhere, so this is not the Black Plague. The economic shutdowns were unnecessary, and the people most affected by them are the working class. Government officials, as everyone who’s paying attention knows, have gone about their business as usual. Salaries, exotic vacations and parties. Don’t know about this? I suggest you broaden your news-gathering scope.

Incredibly, one of the most ham-fisted government overreactions to the pandemic is Australia, and that’s going on to this day. Coincidentally, one of the best news organizations anywhere in the world is Sky News Australia. In the video above, the engaging Alan Jones reports on how Singapore is handling the pandemic now.

Even more details are available at The Straits Times. Singapore is smart.


The Political Plague

This is the first political pandemic in world history. What’s up with that? I have my suspicions. A recent Gallup Poll asked if people with no symptoms and otherwise healthy should remain at home or go out and live their lives normally. About 80 percent of Republicans in America said go out and live normally. Over 70 percent of Democrats said stay home, i.e. continue cowering in the closet. Incredible.

Masks, flags & words

Yes, it’s that time again, time to focus on leftist lunacy. First, we stress the political aspect, with Bill Maher, of the Kung Flu, and then there’s that New York Times editorial writer who is “disturbed” by seeing American flags. She is young, female and black,* so you know she was a diversity hire, i.e. affirmative action. I’m unfamiliar with the other NYT editorial writers, but you can count on their being cut from similar cloth.

If you get your “news” from the NYT or The Washington Post and their ilk, you are misinformed to a shocking degree. You need help.

Regular reading of The Unseen Moon is a good start. We’re here to assist.


A word about words

There’s lots of name-calling going on in these troubled times, and much of it is outdated. Indeed, many words now are misused, often intentionally for political purposes. The most obvious is that almost everyone mistakenly refers to leftists as “liberals” and “progressives,” which would be laughable aside from the dreadful effects of it. Leftists are masters of word twists. Conservatives are perilously lousy at it.

Leftists call conservatives “Nazis” and “fascists,” which we aren’t. But when conservatives refer to modern leftists as “Marxists,” there is little correct about that either. Did Marx opine on misgendering, sex-change surgeries, non-binary pronouns, biological men in women’s sports? Was Marx “offended” at this, that and the other? Was there a Marx Cancel Culture? Would Marx have tried to get someone fired for having a different opinion?

Did Marx self-loathe because he was white? (Watch the appalling video below.)

Would Marx have been on board with gay marriage? Did Marx oppose traditional marriage? The answer to all those questions is no. About the only thing Marxist about today’s left is big government and obligated income equality. The other stuff? Nah.

Modern leftists are much more than Marxists. They are far worse.

And Republicans are the liberals now.


*The most notable of those three characteristics is her youth. Editorial writers should possess wisdom and knowledge, something young people rarely have. Traditionally, editorial boards consist of older people with experience in the journalism trenches. They are not indoctrinated, diversity hires right out of Rutgers or NYU.