Tag Archives: Cuernavaca

Just like home

SEVENTEEN YEARS ago when I packed my two bags and flew to Mexico alone to reinvent myself in late middle age, I arrived in a spectacularly strange world.

Many of the things I was accustomed to simply were not available down here, and most of those things were commercial. I am a fan of capitalism and the goodies it offers.

Flash forward from 2000 to 2017 and — oh, my — how things have changed. Just about anything you can buy above the Rio Bravo is now available Down Mejico Way.

There is even a Mexican version of Amazon.com even though I much prefer our homegrown MercadoLibre.

The list of Gringo chain stores in Mexico is too lengthy to repeat here, and it seems to grow longer each year.*

I was particularly delighted when Bed Bath & Beyond, one of my favorite stores when I lived up north, opened recently in the nearby state capital. I shop there often.

There are eight BB&Bs in Mexico. Six are in Mexico City or its environs. A seventh is in Cuernavaca, the not-too-distant Mexico City playground,  and the eighth is in our capital city, the only one relatively remote from Mexico City.

Why were we chosen over the considerably larger burgs of Guadalajara or Monterrey? God knows.

Mexico commercially improves on a daily basis. You can now get most of what is available to the Gringos up north. Plus, we have great tacos, fresh avocados and beautiful babes.

Best of both worlds.

* * * *

* Very incomplete list: Best Buy, Sears, Costco, Walmart, McDonald’s, Burger King, Chili’s, Sirloin Stockade, iHop, Home Depot, Office Depot, Office Max, KFC, DQ, Starbucks.

(Note: We don’t depend entirely on the Gringos for great shopping. For example, the Mexican chain El Palacio de Hierro — The Iron Palace — will knock your high-end socks off, especially the flagship store in Mexico City’s Polanco.)

Dark to light

IT WAS COLD and dark, but she did not shiver nor was she afraid.

She was dead, lying inside a refrigerated cubicle in the morgue of the Hospital Popular in Los Santos, Mexico. She had died yesterday after weeks of silent suffering and waiting, waiting for this day and death.

Her children visited most every day, but not yesterday, the day she died. They should have been notified, of course, but perhaps the staff was rushed or maybe it was a clerical error. But here she sprawled inside the cubicle, alone.

The cubicle door opened, and the drawer on which she lay rolled out into the cutting room. Though it would be bright there, she remained in darkness, and the cold did not go away, though it did not bother her. She heard gasps of her two daughters, Gertrudis and Lupita.

Then she was pushed back into the drawer.

Time passed. She had no way of gauging it, and it did not matter anyway. But then the cubicle door opened, and she was pulled once more into the cutting room. There was Father Ignacio. He spoke in the tongue of the old Romans and she felt his hand on her head.

LeafShe opened her eyes. The blackness had turned to a baby-blue light, and another hand was on her head. It was Manuel, her husband of 42 years who died long ago. He smiled, and he was young again. And so was she.

And it was warm, like the constant springtime of Cuernavaca.