Tag Archives: dreams

Vanishing future

Route of young men.

I’LL TURN 73 toward the end of summer. This aging thing is quite interesting. I don’t recommend it, but it’s interesting.

Forget that malarkey about age being just a number. That’s arrant nonsense. The difference between a child of 10, a middle-ager of 45 and a coot of 73 is just a number?

Dream on, brother.

When you’re in your 60s, you realize you’re no kid or anywhere near it. But turning 70 is quite an eye-opener.

More and more I notice this phenomenon: “Future” vanishes. That long, straight macadam that disappears into the distance as if you’re motoring toward a faraway mountain chain, the Highway of Future. Well, you’re not driving it anymore, Bub.

Instead, you’re on Present Lane.

When you’re younger, “future” is simply something that’s out there, and it’s way out there, so far out there that you don’t really dwell on it. It’s just there, and you know it.

In your bones.

This mostly subconscious notion of an endless future affects lots of things — attitudes, lifestyle, decisions, plans.

Passing 70 years delivers an immediacy to life that you’d never known before. It’s very interesting. I do not recommend it, but there ain’t nothing you can do about it.

Not one blessed thing.

Route of old men.

The demon urge

BACK IN JULY, I posted Geezer Dreams in which I spoke of my desire to buy a new car and/or a motorcycle.

I need neither, but dreams are not made of needs but of desires. Putting aside the car idea was fairly easy. The motorcycle, well, that’s another matter altogether. It still haunts me.

Just this morning (!), I had deleted saved internet links of various motorcycles, and I’d swapped my internet screen saver from a bike to a Mexican flag, my old screen saver.

Just hours later, I saw the above video on the blog Surviving Yucatan, and it’s got me all roiled up again. Dang! Those old Chinese buzzards make me look like a babe in diapers.

Like a freaking pantywaist.

Geezer dreams

easy-rider-dennis-hooper-peter-fonda-jack-nicholson

OVER THE PAST month I’ve been embracing some very thrilling ideas.

Dreams that have reached the very edge of realization though the reality has yet to happen and likely will not.

We all have dreams, but what sets these dreams of mine apart is that they were given very serious consideration. One or both might still happen, but likely not.

Without further ado, here they are:

(1) Buy a motorcycle. I’m a biker from way back and even though I sold my last ride around 1990, the siren call remains. Over the past month, research has narrowed my future ride — if the dream were to get off the ground — down to this:

The 2016 Suzuki Boulevard C50, an 800-cc, cruiser-style machine. I think I would look very fine astride it.

Much of motorcycling is about style, of course, and I’ve even investigated that. Were I to buy the bike, I would also order appropriate accoutrements from this place.

They’ve told me they ship to Mexico. I told you that I was looking into this very seriously.

I already have a biker babe here in the house, the most important accoutrement of all.

Given the spectacular exchange rate these days, the motorcycle would cost about $8,000. The Harley Sportster I purchased in 1977 cost $5,000. That the comparable Suzuki is just $3,000 more almost 40 years later is surprising.

(2.) Buy a new car. This is slightly more likely to happen, but just slightly. My current ride is a 2009 Honda CR-V, which I purchased new. I’ve never liked it.

It’s about eight years old now, and has never given me a lick of real trouble. It’s a great car. Its sole defects are some design lunacies that only the driver would notice.

Of course, that is always me.

No matter. If I buy a new car, I’ve narrowed it down to the 2016 Chevrolet Trax.* It would be the fourth new car I’ve purchased since moving to Mexico, if you don’t count the 2014 Nissan March we bought for my child bride 18 months ago.

With the current resale value of the Honda factored in, the Chevrolet would set me back about $8,000, just like the motorcycle. How about that? I have $8,000.

I don’t need a new car, and I probably would perish on the bike, so neither of these dreams is likely to happen.

But you never know.

Magic happens in Mexico.

* * * *

* The two cars previous to the Honda were Chevrolets, a Pop (Geo Metro clone) and a Meriva, also available as a German Opel. I loved them both.

Late in the day

STANDING IN the darkening bedroom between the king bed and the huge window, I watch it raining.

Late afternoon.

Between me and that window is a love-seat equipal and its matching single seat, both dark green, the first furniture I bought in Mexico years back.

The green is cloth, which differs from the more common cowhide you see on most equipal furniture. I had the set special made in Guadalajara, and it took ages to get here.

It’s fading now, the back, due to abutting that open window. I’m fading too but for other reasons. Time.

The rain bounces off the monster aloe vera just to the left and the leaves of the golden datura straight ahead.

My child bride is at the gym, so I’m standing solo, waiting for her, which I do many evenings. If she’s not at the gym, she’s swapping family tales with her sister.

She’ll be home before 8.

I’ll have two big salads made, our supper we enjoy on lounge chairs upstairs while watching something on Netflix.

Dull old people in the mountains of Mexico.

This has been going on for years. Sometimes it’s raining and cool. Other times it’s dry and cold. And yet other times — springtime — it’s dry and stuffy.

But now it’s raining and cool. I stare out the window and wonder, how did this happen? It’s good.

When I get up in the middle of the night for a wizz, I often pause at the bathroom window to see the streetlight and the mountains if the moon is out.

How did this happen?

It’s said that life is what happens while you’re making other plans. This is usually understood to be negative, but sometimes plans pale in the face of sweet, accidental reality.

Living easy

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LET’S LOOK at how, with a little luck and a bit of forethought, you can leave your old life behind and start anew.

Pay off those bills, chuck those worries, say adiós to the folks who are always annoying you, pack your bags, get on a plane and fly over the southern border.

You know you want to.

Here are some photos that illustrate what you can do with effort and a little cash, less than you might think.

First, there are flowers. The top photo was taken in our yard a couple of years ago. The rains are just getting started, and soon we´ll have this view again. The golden datura outside the bedroom window sent sweet smells to us just last night.

Only lunatics want to live on a Mexican beach because it’s often hot and buggy, a situation somewhat like those folks who always annoyed you. But the beach is great for a visit.

And then you head back to the cool mountains.

DSCF1370

This photo was taken a few years ago. That’s my child bride in a  pool in Zihuatanejo, just a 3.5-hour drive down an autopista from the Hacienda.

This is living easy, and you can do it too. I know you want to.

Pack your bags and wave adiós.

Do it before you die.

Dream, dream, dream

dreams

A DREAM LIST for you:

1. Outlawing guns will reduce violence. There is no evidence of this. The old saw, If you outlaw guns, only outlaws will have guns, is absolutely true. Look at Mexico.

2. Outlawing drugs will reduce drug use. After 40 years of the “War on Drugs,” any half-witted teenager can get narcotics easily, usually just a few blocks away. Look around you.

3. The War on Poverty was/is good. After 50 years of this war, the U.S. poverty rate is virtually unchanged. Giving money to poor people is a waste of cash and makes them dependent. Poverty’s roots often are psychological, not monetary. This is especially true in the Developed World.

4. Diversity is good. Fact is that nations in which diverse races, religions and cultures rub shoulders are usually plagued by discord, violence and murder. Don’t promote multiculturalism if you want to live in peace. Nations are built on uniformity.

Those who cannot remember the past are doomed to repeat it.

— George Santayana

In the list above, No. 2 is a conservative dream. The other three are collectivist dreams. Generally, collectivists are greater dreamers than conservatives.

* * * *

The Everly Brothers accent this point.