Singapore is smart

When the Kung Flu was flung upon the world stage about March of last year, I was concerned. Everyone was concerned. It was being hyped almost as the Black Plague. Stay home, governments hollered via their pals in the news media, or you’ll die. My child bride and I obeyed and stayed home except for shopping.

I bet you did the same.

A couple of months later, I noticed the streets were not lined with corpses, plus I knew no one who had died or even caught the Kung Flu. Phooey with this, I told myself, and we went out and about, starting May 10, doing what we normally did, but often with masks, and maintaining that distance thing.

Time passed, and I paid attention to the news, not so much the mainstream (government) media, but other information sources that seemed more realistic and honest. I became less and less concerned about the Kung Flu. These days I wear no mask except to enter the occasional store where it’s required. I do not do “social distance.”

There is a Mexican government website that keeps track of Kung Flu cases in virtually every nook and cranny of Mexico. I’ve been watching it since last year. To date, about 1.65 percent of my town’s population has been infected in some way, which is to say over 98 percent of our 98,000 population has not caught Kung Flu. Of the minuscule proportion that has, almost all would have recovered at home in bed with Tylenol or something similar.

Comparatively small percentages exist almost everywhere, so this is not the Black Plague. The economic shutdowns were unnecessary, and the people most affected by them are the working class. Government officials, as everyone who’s paying attention knows, have gone about their business as usual. Salaries, exotic vacations and parties. Don’t know about this? I suggest you broaden your news-gathering scope.

Incredibly, one of the most ham-fisted government overreactions to the pandemic is Australia, and that’s going on to this day. Coincidentally, one of the best news organizations anywhere in the world is Sky News Australia. In the video above, the engaging Alan Jones reports on how Singapore is handling the pandemic now.

Even more details are available at The Straits Times. Singapore is smart.


The Political Plague

This is the first political pandemic in world history. What’s up with that? I have my suspicions. A recent Gallup Poll asked if people with no symptoms and otherwise healthy should remain at home or go out and live their lives normally. About 80 percent of Republicans in America said go out and live normally. Over 70 percent of Democrats said stay home, i.e. continue cowering in the closet. Incredible.

Return to normal?

For months and months, access to our lovely plaza has been shut down by the municipal government for no good reason that I know of. Now and then, we’d be teased and it would open for a day or two, but then it would slam shut again. This was a Kung Flu measure, of course. I doubt anyone avoided the virus due to having to walk just outside the plaza instead of down the nice sidewalk.

Last Saturday we found it open when we drove downtown for my child bride’s resurrected weekly pastry sale. It seems to have been open ever since — I was there yesterday — which makes sense because the pandemic is, for all practical purposes, over.

But the Dancing Bears continue to wear useless facemasks, though I detect it may be a hair less common.

The two women passing near the end of the video are my child bride, in the black shirt, and her sister. Feel free to think of them as Mutt and Jeff. The two actual mutts following them belong to the sister. We don’t do dogs. But some dogs are nice.

My sister-in-law, a Dancing Bear, has a facemask dutifully and uselessly draped under her chin. My wife does not, but she does dance a mean salsa.

I was sitting on a concrete bench enjoying a lemon ice when I shot this video. I also took the following photos just for the heck of it because it was a lovely day. I framed them in wood for you. May the plaza remain open from now on. I pray so.

Same direction as the video.
And then the other direction.

‘It’s like a pacifier’

The state in which I live is now green on that stoplight thing, which means the Kung Flu situation is pretty much over. You can come out from under your bed now. What’s that? You like it under there? You feel safe and warm? From an affliction with almost a 99% survival rate, which in most cases is mild and you recover at home with Tylenol?

I don’t wear a mask anywhere unless it’s required, usually to enter a store. I put one on without a fuss, the thin, useless, homemade, cloth mask I’ve kept folded in my jeans pocket for months. It’s pure theater. That’s it to the left. It does squat aside from forcing me to recycle air my body is trying to eject.

The people in my mountaintop town are spectacularly addicted to masks, a phenomenon I watch and roll my eyeballs at whenever I’m downtown sitting at a sidewalk table enjoying a nice café Americano negro. Even toddlers are masked.

According to a government website, about 1.5% of our town of 98,000 people have had Kung Flu at any level, which is to say that 98.5% of us have not been infected, and now it’s going away. Boy, those are really frightening figures.

I wonder if we’ll be able to kick the mask habit or if we’ll continue flocking about the sidewalks like the sheep we’ve become. Stay tuned.

This video focuses on the mask obsession. I imagine it was taped in New York City, a heavily Democratic town and, of course, coronavirus is extremely political, Democrats being far more mask-addicted than we smarter conservatives.

No free lunch

We can always count on John Stossel to put things in perspective. And you can always count on me to point out the rampant imbecilities that run amok these days among spoiled, clueless Americans.

In this video Stossel showcases Americans who think that loans do not need to be repaid, but those loans — especially government-guaranteed tuition loans — often are paid by blue-collar workers who have no choice in the matter.

I have been a blue-collar worker. I enjoyed it. I might still be one had I not been stymied by unions. I left the newspaper game in the early 1980s. I went to a trade school and studied electrical construction technology. I have an Associate Degree in that.

I worked for a while in commercial construction, helping build a massive Schwegmann’s supermarket in Metairie, Louisiana.

But I was less interested in commercial construction than in residential work, an area mostly controlled by the electricians’ union in New Orleans. In order to reduce competition, the union blocked new membership to anyone over 25 years old. I was in my early 30s at the time. I am not a fan of unions. I returned to newspapering.

Blue-collar workers should not be forced to finance university degrees for others, especially these days when universities are leftist indoctrination centers, and students build massive debt to get silly degrees.

This works.
This doesn’t.

Mind Control

Let’s move on to another subject. Let’s look at face masks. Here we have two examples. The one on the left is virus control. The one on the right is mind control.

Do what we say!

I wear neither voluntarily. I don’t need the one on the left, but I sport the one on the right when I have to enter a store that requires it, as many hereabouts still do.

In my town, I am constantly surprised and disappointed at the YUGE percentage of the population that wears masks, especially where it simply makes no sense whatsoever, such as driving alone in a car or walking alone in the open air down a sidewalk. The people who do those things have lost their ability to think rationally.

They have lost their minds.


(Note: I ate my first raw oyster in a Schwegmann’s supermarket bar. Yes, Schwegmann’s stores often included bars. It was a sweltering summer afternoon, and I was sitting solo on a barstool at the Schwegmann’s on Airline Highway in Metairie. After more than a few cold Dixie beers, I ordered a dozen raw oysters out of curiosity. I was hooked.)