The bedroom

bedroom

THIS APPEARS to be a bedroom. There’s the antique bed that’s been neatly made up. There’s an armoire to the right.

And an apparatus to repair flat tires rests in the foreground, and an electric welder sits between the bed and the armoire which has a picture of Jesus attached.

Someone repairs auto tires and does welding to boot. It also appears to be Home Sweet Home.

The bedroom/business is open to the street. The only thing separating it from the sidewalk is an old, chain-link fence. There’s a makeshift roof overhead. A good night’s sleep would be a challenge beneath rain, lightning, thunder.

Strung vertically is a line with cloth that can be pulled down to make a curtain to hide the sleepyhead from people passing by on the sidewalk late at night.

I snapped this photo through the chain-link fence. There was no one home at the time. Or at work either. It was late Friday afternoon. Perhaps he was out for a beer.

Odds are that this fellow is not married. He appears to be a hard worker. Neat too. He makes up his bed.

And he believes in Jesus.

Elbows and shins

LET’S LOOK at illegal entry into the United States. Leftists, those marvelous language-twisters, have melded illegal entry-invasion with the broader, milder topic of immigration.

They label this stew of issues with one word: immigration. Yes, that is correct. The U.S. legal system by which foreigners apply for and — if they are fortunate — receive visas, and the issue of criminally tunneling or climbing fences into America is one and the same. No real difference, ya  know.

Leftists’ intentional combining of the different issues does this: It smears those of us who favor law and order, a positive thing, with the stench of xenophobia, a negative thing.

errorLeftist command of language is remarkable, and conservatives’ lack of such is lamentable. Leftists are so skilled that they’ve donned the lovely cloaks of “liberal” and “progressive.”

There are basically two groups who favor open borders: (1) Confused Christians and (2) Flower Children.

Sometimes a person is both.

Christians cite the need to care for the unfortunate. South of the Rio Bravo and, especially, south of Mexico, there is a multitude of unfortunates. The confused Christians favor letting as many as possible move to the United States.

It’s the Way of Jesus. Glory, hallelujah!

This is admirable, dreamy-eyed, and absolutely unworkable. America cannot support all the world’s unfortunates, or even a sizable percentage of them.

Like Marxism itself, it’s a beautiful notion — a pipe dream — that’s totally unrealistic, undoable.

Flower Children: This category is far broader than actual Flower Children left over from the 1960s. It includes everyone who hums Kumbaya and lacks reasoning skills.

These folks invariably support the Democrat Party.

The distinct issues of legal immigration vs. illegal sneaking across the border should never been confused. If you support the former and oppose the latter, speak out when leftists maliciously accuse you of being anti-immigration.

Immigration is a far cry from the graver problem of a nation that picks which of its own laws to obey, something we see from the Oval Office down to sanctuary cities.

When you hear people pretending that they are one and the same, give them your elbow. Then haul back and kick them in the shins. You’ll feel so much better for it.

Don’t remain quiet.

It’s criminality that conservatives oppose, not immigration.

Faces of Easter

jesus
A very unhappy Jesus passes in a street of San Miguel.

WE SPENT two nights in San Miguel de Allende that, by pure chance, sat in Semana Santa, Easter Week.

We drove there to visit an old friend who had flown down from Texas with a couple who had invited him to share a few days in a vacation rental in the Gringo-infested town.

The old friend and I had planned this get-together months ago, neither realizing it was Semana Santa. It just dawned on me about two weeks ago.

Semana Santa, to Mexicans, is Spring Break with Jesus Christ. We have a multitude of religious ceremonies and Easter parades here on the mountaintop and tons of tourists, but I figured it would be calmer in San Miguel.

I could not have been more mistaken.

It was almost like Mardi Gras in New Orleans. Downtown was mobbed with people. Lines waited outside restaurants.

Streets were blocked.

We arrived Thursday for two nights and one full day — Good Friday — in a downtown hotel, and we left yesterday.

We had a great visit with the friend, and we came away with these two faces — photos — of Semana Santa.

A third photo shows another face, a sad one, a man who passed on the street in the best way he could. Every few feet he would stop, squat upright on the street, and jiggle his coin can.

What struck me most about him, apart from his disability, was that his hair was trimmed and slicked back very neatly.

Everyone has pride.

family
Everybody smile for the cameras, theirs and mine too.