Road to Uruapan

Uruapan is a city about 30 miles southwest of here. We hadn’t been there, not downtown at least, in maybe two years due to the Kung Flu hysteria. We rectified that error Saturday.

Heading out in the Honda before noon, we barreled down the autopista, not something I enjoy doing. Decades ago, Mexico’s toll roads were almost universally four lanes, which is how the Goddess wishes it. But some years ago, economic geniuses decided to make new ones with two lanes. Of course, it was a fiscal decision.

The problem is that Mexicans, who drive like lunatics anyway, continued driving on two-lane autopistas as if they were still four lanes. The shoulders now serve as the missing two lanes, or sometimes straddling the center line adds a lane. Around a curve. This makes for interesting drives. Nobody has slowed down.

The autopista between my mountaintop town and Uruapan is one of the newer two-laners, and driving on it is a white-knuckle proposition. We drove down on the autopista, but we returned on the old route that was used before that autopista was constructed.

The advantages of the old route is that it’s free, and it’s a beautiful ride. Autopistas are toll roads, and they can be quite pricy. The main disadvantage of the old route is that you can get caught behind a slow semi for miles because the route is very curvy.

The photo above is the return, and it was taken through the windshield because it was raining.

It’s a beautiful drive that runs from our high town down, down, down to a noticeably different world that is tropical. Banana trees and avocado orchards are plentiful. And so are narcos, unfortunately.

Our destination was two-pronged. The national park that sits in the middle of town, and a hotel restaurant that rests on the edge of that park. I call it the jungle park, because that’s what it looks like. You could be in Ecuador. The hotel is La Mansion del Cupatitzio.

A good-looking babe who sleeps with me strikes a pose in the park.

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About 20 years ago, a then-friend here in my mountaintop town recommended the restaurant in the hotel, specifically the avocado cocktail.

Cocktail!

I say “then-friend” because a couple of years ago, when she discovered I was a Trump fan, she cut ties via an expletive-filled email. Twenty years up in smoke.

We’ve been going to the park and the restaurant for years, and we always get the avocado cocktail combined with some additional vittles. After the park, and after lunch, we hopped into the Honda again and headed home in the rain.

It was good to leave Uruapan because, with some notable exceptions like the jungle park, it’s mostly a butt-ugly city.

First time I’ve ever seen ziplining in the park. Must be new.

Buttcrack baby

(Viewer discretion advised. Video includes appalling moments.)


As has been mentioned here previously, my child bride has turned to other activities over the past year due to the Kung Flu hysteria, temporarily halting her sidewalk pastry sales. She has turned to crochet.

Up to now, she has created elephants, Rotweillers, unicorns, lions, camels and so on, but now she’s tackled the human form. Some of you might want to avert your eyes from the video. You’ve been warned.

The dress is separate and removable as are the sandals and panties.

The child in question is named Matilda. She is a white girl, which means she was born with privilege, giving her a pass through an easy, blessed life. Next on the crochet list, however, will be a chocolate child who will, of course, be oppressed.

I am not making this up. Stay tuned.

Kung flu days

My child bride was sitting on the bedroom love seat this afternoon when I snapped this shot. She was crocheting an elephant, which is one method of passing time during the interminable Kung Flu days. Maybe I should crochet.

We’re told the Kung Flu is worsening in our area, but at the same time a federal government website has my mountaintop in Code Yellow, which is one below Code Orange and two below Code Red. We were in Code Orange for a good spell.

The state government has ordered all nonessential businesses to close on Sundays and at 7 p.m. weekdays, and that’s been going on for two weeks now. I don’t think that serves any useful purpose aside from causing economic problems for people.

I favor the Swedish approach and that of South Dakota.

A more efficient method would be to convince Mexicans to not hug and kiss each other relentlessly, an inconvenient aspect of Latino culture they simply cannot stop doing, come hell or high water, as the saying goes.

Recent news also claims our local government hospital, the one that treats serious Kung Flu patients, is at 100 percent capacity, and the above-mentioned government website says we now have a total of 10 folks hospitalized. Is 10 folks all we can manage?

Our town’s population is about 98,000, so 10 in the hospital sounds like good odds. We also have eight “suspicious” cases, the website reports. We’ve also had 1,324 confirmed cases of which 1,219 have recuperated. Again, I like those odds, which is why I don’t wear a mask when I run around town unless I’m obligated to, normally to enter a business.

We took our daily walk around the neighborhood plaza this morning. She wore a mask, and I did not because were in the open air and nobody was anywhere near us.

It would be like wearing a mask while driving alone in your car. Only a nut does that.

The crushing lockdowns

Democrat officials — the governor of California and the mayor of Los Angeles among many others — are fond of lockdowns that push business owners into bankruptcy and employees onto the unemployment lines. All for “public health,” of course.

The State of South Dakota did not go that route, nor did the nation of Sweden, and their Kung Flu numbers are not significantly worse than lockdown zones.

Here’s how it’s gone on my Mexican mountaintop. Keep in mind that laws and rules in Mexico often are ignored, and nobody does anything about it. I used to criticize that cultural trait, but now I find it endearing, especially as it relates to Kung Flu.

Mexico has a website that purports to show the Kung Flu stats in every nook and cranny, and maybe it does. Let’s assume so. As I write this, I’m looking at the Dec. 8 report. For Mexico as a whole, there are 1,193,255 confirmed cases and 1,029,250 who’ve recovered, leaving just 164,005 with Kung Flu on that date. But the website also says there are just 53,131 active cases, which is a contradiction. Go figure.

The population of Mexico is almost 130 million, so those Kung Flu numbers look mighty small, percentage-wise. Going with the 53,131 number for active cases, that would be about 0.04 percent of the population. Very few sick folks.

But back to my mountaintop town. Our population is about 98,000 Catholic souls, and we’ve had — as of Dec. 8 — 1,073 confirmed cases of whom 977 have recovered, which would leave 96 still sick. But the website says just 27 are active cases. Go figure, again.

The 1,073 confirmed cases are about 1.1 percent of the mountaintop’s population, most of whom have returned to good health. Our death toll is 69, about 0.07 percent of the population. Bottom line is that these numbers are minuscule.

And our lockdown? In April, May, June the government tried to lock us down, and it was marginally successful. It hounded some businesses, closed a few temporarily, cordoned off the two downtown plazas, put up lots of threatening posters, etc. But most people went about their lives as usual. In real life, we are kind of like Sweden and South Dakota.

Most of us are healthy. Most businesses have long since reopened. The plazas too. Many folks walking around downtown have the bibs hanging under their chins.

And in Los Angeles, New York, and Chicago, etc., the new breed of wacky Democrat officials are grinding the economy into the dirt while the same Democrat officials party hearty and often get caught at it. And the United States may soon install Democrat Socialists in the White House. It’s gonna go great. You’re gonna love it. Trust me.

Relief is just a short move over the southern border, amigos. But forget the northern border because, in some ways, Canada is significantly worse. More on that soon. Stay tuned.