Crooks, cash, cars

NEVER A DULL moment here. I offer examples:

Three armed nitwits decided to rob a bus heading north from Mexico City to the burg of Pachuca.  They boarded as passengers but soon revealed their evil intentions.

One of the geniuses fired a bullet upward to scare the passengers. The bullet bounced off the roof and killed one of the other bandidos. In the ensuing confusion, passengers grabbed a surviving genius and beat him to death.

Passengers held the third genius for police.

I love this sort of yarn. You can read details right here.

But, really, I can’t stop laughing.

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Moving away from crime, let’s look at banking.

Up until last year a bit over half of Mexican adults had no bank account. But in the last year that percentage has risen a nice 12 percent. Credit card use is up too, a mixed blessing.

I find this encouraging — that we are less inclined to keep our cash under the mattress.

You can read details right here.

I have accounts at two Mexican banks, and both include credit cards. I no longer have a U.S. bank account nor U.S. credit cards. Obama’s boys screwed that up for me.

* * * *

One of Mexico’s most popular cars will go out of existence around 2019. The Nissan Tsuru.

Mexico is finally getting serious about safety standards. Also feeling the axe will be the Chevrolet Aveo and Matiz, the Nissan Tiida and the Volkswagen Gol.

But it’s the Tsuru that will be most missed. It is everywhere, especially in taxi fleets. Before we bought my wife’s Nissan March two years ago, we considered a Tsuru but decided against it specifically for the safety factors.

You can read more about the changes right here.

The never-changing Tsuru bears a remarkable resemblance to the Toyota Corolla I owned in Houston. Why is that?