Tag Archives: psychology

Just say no

I OFFER this as a public service.

Alas, most folks who read The Unseen Moon, I imagine, are far from being adults with young children.

I read a news story not long ago, an interview with an Army drill sergeant. He said that most recruits today had clearly never had anyone tell them “no” and mean it.

Most of these kids are in universities now, not the Army.

Trump: The gin bottle

(Today’s guest post comes to us from The Wall Street Journal, and it’s written by David Gelernter, a professor of computer science at Yale. The Unseen Moon dedicates this to libertarians and renegade conservatives planning to vote for a fringe candidate or not to vote at all.)

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hillarySOME CONSERVATIVES have watched their evaluations of Donald Trump’s character drop so low in recent days that on this vital question they no longer see a choice between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

Accordingly, they are forced back onto politics and policy; and naturally Mr. Trump wins in a walk.

If conservatives who argue that Mr. Trump is worse than Mrs. Clinton had a case, it would be a relief to vote for Mrs. Clinton or for no one. But they don’t, and one is therefore forced for the good of the nation to vote for Mr. Trump.

In his Mr. Nauseating video of last weekend, Mr. Trump showed us that he had all the class and cool of a misbegotten 12-year-old boy. Yet the video taught us nothing. No one had ever mistaken him for anything but an infantile vulgarian.

This week’s allegations of actual abuse are different. If these stories are true (and I don’t know why they shouldn’t be*), there is nothing to be said for Mr. Trump.

trumpUnfortunately, there is nothing to be said for Mrs. Clinton either. If we don’t take both facts into account, we are not morally serious.

Mrs. Clinton has nothing on Mr. Trump when it comes to character. She lies (“Wipe? Like with a cloth?” — cute and charming, Mrs. C.) the way basketball stars shoot baskets — constantly, nonstop, because it’s the one thing she is best at and (naturally) it gives her pleasure to hear herself lie — swish! — right onto the evening news.

And her specialist talent of all is the verbal kick in the groin of a Secret Service man or state trooper who has the nerve to talk to her as if she were merely human.

She is no mere rock star. She is Hillary the Queen. She is so big, and you are so small, she can barely even see you from up there. What are you? A macromolecule?

I’ll vote for Mr. Trump — grimly. But there is no alternative, no shadow of a responsible alternative.

Mr. Trump’s candidacy is a message from the voters. He is the empty gin bottle they have tossed through the window.

The message begins with the fact that voters hear what the leaders and pundits don’t: the profound contempt for America and Americans that Mrs. Clinton and President Obama share and their frightening lack of emotional connection to this nation and its people.

Mr. Obama is arch, patronizing, so magnificently weary of having to explain it all, again and again, to the dummies surrounding him.

ºººººººººº

ginDonald Trump is the empty gin bottle that voters have tossed through the window.

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Mrs. Clinton has told us proudly how thoroughly she prepared for the first debate and has prepared to be president.

For her, it is all a matter of learning your lines. Her whole life has been memorized in advance. Mr. Obama is at least sincere. Mrs. Clinton is as phony as a three-dollar bill, as a Clinton Global Initiative.

Mr. Obama has governed like a third-rate tyrant. He’s been a stern babysitter to an American public that is increasingly getting on his nerves.

ObamaCare and the Iran treaty are his big achievements. That the public has always disliked them, and hates them worse as it knows them better, strikes him as so unspeakably irrelevant. He doesn’t know whether to laugh or cry.

Do you ask 6-year-olds if they like going to school?

Mrs. Clinton couldn’t agree more. Policy is for smart people, who are people of the left by definition — leftists having scored all those big successes over the years in foreign policy, race relations, policing, restarting wounded economies, making unsecured loans, running school systems and so on.

On topics from Keystone to Guantanamo, Mr. Obama has made it clear that he doesn’t give a damn what people think — he no longer even tries to explain to the citizenry.

Do your homework! Understand?

Yes, leadership sometimes requires that you take an unpopular position and make it popular. We are told that Mr. Obama is working on his “legacy” instead, as if that makes him farsighted instead of irresponsible and insanely vain.

Presidents are supposed to run the country, not worry about their reputation in coming centuries.

IRRELEVANT VOTERS

Trump voters have noticed that, not just over Mr. Obama’s term but in recent decades, their own opinions have grown increasingly irrelevant.

It’s something you feel, like encroaching numbness.

Since when has the American public endorsed affirmative action? Yet it’s a major factor in the lives of every student and many workers.

Since when did we decide that men and women are interchangeable in hand-to-hand combat on the front lines? Why do we insist on women in combat but not in the NFL? Because we take football seriously.

That’s no joke. It’s the sad truth.

Did we invite the federal bureaucracy to take charge of school bathrooms? I guess I missed that meeting. The schools are corrupt and the universities rotten to the core, and everyone has known it since the 1980s.

But the Democrats are owned by the teachers unions, and Republicans have made only small-scale corrections to a system that needs to be ripped out and carefully disposed of, like poison ivy.

The Emasculated Voter to whom no one pays any attention is the story of modern democracy.

Instead of putting voters in charge, we tell them they’re in charge, and it’s just as good. That’s the Establishment’s great discovery in the Lois Lerner Age.

Enter Mr. Trump. People say he became a star because he just happened to mention an issue that just happened to catch on. But immigration is the central issue of our time.

Trump voters zeroed in because they saw what most intellectuals didn’t. What is our nation and what will it be?

Will America go on being America or turn into something else? That depends on who lives here — especially given our schools, which no longer condescend to teach Americanism.

The liberal theory is that, other things being equal, all human beings have an equal right to settle in America. For liberals this is too obvious to spell out. But it is also too ludicrous to defend.

AN OPEN BACKYARD?

Does all mankind have a right to camp in your backyard, eat in your kitchen, work at your office and borrow your best jogging outfit? We fail in our duty if we don’t think carefully whom we want in this country, who would be best for America.

Furthermore, we know that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”

But that’s got nothing to do with immigration. Freedom of religion means freedom for American citizens — what else could it possibly mean?

We must not tamper with Americans’ religious life. We must not admit, as possible future citizens, anyone we don’t choose to, anyone we don’t think will be good for America.

Not to admit Muslims is bad policy, but it does not violate freedom of religion, and the American people have a perfect right to discuss and debate it.

Hold on, some of my fellow conservatives say.

Never mind Hillary. Trump would be dangerous. He would further endanger our national security and world position.

He might start unnecessary wars. He might even push the nuclear button.

These are important objections, but after thinking them through I’m unable to take them seriously, either in political terms or psychological ones.

HILLARY FEELS ENTITLED

Mrs. Clinton is right at home in the Oval Office and thinks she owns it. She holds herself entitled to supreme power, as her friends are entitled to fancy positions with enormous salaries and her followers to secure government jobs or ample government funds, as the case may be.

But forget psychology. Ordinary politics says that Mr. Trump will not do crazy things or go off half-cocked, because Republicans in Congress will be eager to impeach him and put Mike Pence in charge.

That was the subtext of the vice-presidential debate, though Mr. Pence himself (probably) didn’t intend it. When it’s my turn, you can all relax. Democrats, obviously, will be eager to help when the task is removing a Republican.

Impeachment is Trump-voters’ ace in the hole.

It’s an abnormal measure, but this is an abnormal year. Impeachment has temporarily dropped out of sight because of special circumstances. Republicans impeached Bill Clinton but got burned in the process.

Mr. Obama, as the first black president, was impeachment-proof. Any other president would have encountered serious impeachment talk on several occasions, especially when he ignored Congress and the Constitution and made his own personal treaty-in-all-but-name with Iran.

But Mr. Trump will not have Mr. Obama’s advantages — to say the least. Mr. Trump will be impeachment bait. So will Mrs. Clinton. Even some Democrats have had enough.

Nothing can stop Mr. Trump from shooting off his mouth, but that’s all right. I want America’s enemies off-balance and guessing. For eight years it’s been Humiliate America season — buzz our ships, capture and embarrass our men, murder an American ambassador — a resoundingly successful attempt to spit in our faces and tell each one of us to drop dead.

Thanks, Mr. President. Enough is enough. You know that Hillary is Obama Part III. We can’t let that happen. Parts I and II have brought us close enough to catastrophe.

That is the problem for those whose integrity or nobility won’t allow them to vote for Mr. Trump despite their dislike of Mrs. Clinton.

There is only one way to take part in protecting this nation from Hillary Clinton, and that is to vote for Donald Trump.

A vote for anyone else or for no one might be an honest, admirable gesture in principle, but we don’t need conscientious objectors in this war for the country’s international standing and hence for the safety of the world and the American way of life. It’s too bad one has to vote for Mr. Trump.

It will be an unhappy moment at best. Some people will feel dirty, or pained, or outright disgraced.

But when all is said and done, it’s no big deal of a sacrifice for your country. I can think of bigger ones.

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* The sudden outbreak of groping allegations is a repeat of the Democrats’ successful gutter campaign against Herman Cain. Neither Cain nor Trump had ever faced sexual-harassment accusations in their long careers until they decided to oppose the Democrat Party. What does that tell you?

Pay a person enough, and she’ll say anything.

The sexual-harassment issue is a beloved, useful, politically correct cudgel for leftists.  Think Mattress Girl writ large and often. This asterisk is from Felipe, not the guest poster.

Hula hoop girls

hula

SITTING ON the big plaza eating a cupcake I purchased from the bakery just back of the concrete bench where I was perched, I watched the hula hoop girls yesterday.

Girls just wanna have fun.

Purple banners are going up around the plaza in preparation for Semana Santa, Holy Week, which is a big deal around here, almost as big — or HUGE, as  Donald Trump would say –as Los Muertos, the Day of the Dead.

silencio

There are a number of religious processions downtown during Holy Week, and my favorite is the Procession of Silence, which passes by silently, as advertised. That’s it in the photo, another year, and, yes, they dress up like Klansmen.

But we’ll be missing that parade this year because part of next week will find us in the Gringo-infested town of San Miguel de Allende. I’ll be visiting the consular office to renew my U.S. passport, a passport I don’t anticipate ever needing again, but it’s a habit I cannot seem to break.

We’ll be staying downtown at the Hotel Quinta Loreto. It will be our first stay at that hotel.

While Friday will be spent renewing the passport, on Saturday we’ll be visiting with an old friend whom I’ve not seen in 15 years, the psychologist who stitched my heart back together after my last divorce in the mid-1990s.

He’s visiting San Miguel for only four days, his first trip there. He lives in Austin, Texas.

But that is next week. This week — today, actually — we’re having a birthday party at the Hacienda. Our nephew, the lad once known as the Little Vaquero — turns 13. It seems like only yesterday that he was brought home from the hospital with those huge ears that look quite normal now.

And there you have it: hula hoop girls, Holy Week, San Miguel de Allende and the birthday party.

It’s just one thing after another.