Smacked by a freeze

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But warm enough by noon. And sunny!

YESTERDAY MORNING, I found the birdbath frozen over, first time this season. Must have been a soft freeze because the banana trees weren’t burned too badly.

Overnight freezes are common in winter, and it always warms up quickly after the sun rises, but they still do damage to the yard, sometimes severe.

Around noon, I sat a spell on the yard patio, putting my footsie up on one of the web chairs for you to see. It was lovely out. Nary a cloud, and the sun was nice and warm.

Today is Three Kings’ Day, which is when kiddies get their gifts in Latin America. I wish it were otherwise. I wish they got gifts from Santa instead because then we’d have just two traffic-jammed, abutting holidays instead of dragging it out another week for the Trio of Kings to come on camels, a real pain in the keister.

By today, even Mexican adults have had it up to here, but then they do it all over again the next year. Sometimes I think self-abuse is a genetic trait of my (relatively) new paisanos. Luckily, I was not born here, which gives me a saner approach to it all.

Let us now forge on to Carnival and Easter Week and beyond!

For Carnival, which is a dreadful mob scene in our ramshackle barrio, the worst place in town to be, we’ll be enjoying a great getaway in Guanajuato.

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(Monday morning update! It froze again last night. Oh, dear.)

Curse of bougainvillea

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THE ABOVE SHOWS just a small portion of the fallen bougainvillea leaves I must remove on a regular basis. My patience is running short.

More than 15 years back I planted many things in our yard that I have grown mightily to regret. The nopal tree, now gone. Two pear trees, gone. Peach tree, gone. There are only two major nuisances left, the bougainvillea and a very large loquat.

Just this week, I noticed that a freaking, nasty pigeon is nesting deep in the bougainvillea, no doubt producing more of those large pests. I would remove the nest if I could see it or reach it, but the plant is so thick, that’s next to impossible.

I see her dive in there and disappear. Then there are maternal clucking sounds! If  I’m walking along our sidewalk, and she’s gliding toward the hidden nest, she abruptly detours on spotting me. She thinks I don’t know what’s going on, but I’m sharper than a pigeon.

The damnable pigeon occasionally sits and craps atop the steel superstructure where our upstairs terraza dome will be installed. (Glass is en route, by the way.) Pigeons are a relatively new element in my hardscrabble barrio. I only noticed the first one about a year ago, and now they’re making themselves at home.

If I only possessed a shotgun!

The large plaza downtown is overrun with pigeons now, and people feed them! Welcome! They roost in the attics of the old Colonial buildings surrounding the plaza, making a horrible mess. We wrote a letter to the mayor a few years back, suggesting he put signs on the plaza forbidding the feeding of pigeons.

He ignored us, and the pigeon population continues to swell.

On a positive note, the days now consist of blue skies and cool-enough temperatures. Not only are bougainvillea blooming all over town, but spectacular jacaranda trees too.

And the first flower of our golden datura appeared by the Alamo Wall this week.

Other current events: At this moment, just after High Noon, the folks who live in the hovel out back are blaring music to one and all. Luckily, that side of the Hacienda has no windows save a small one in the upstairs bathroom, so the noise is not a problem.

This afternoon we’ll be lunching at a health-food joint by the docks. Haven’t been there in many a month. Should arrive about 2 p.m. Come join us if you like. Dutch Treat, of course. We’re fixed-income pensioners.

Then later we’ll drive downtown for a stroll around the Semana Santa market that covers the plaza. Some interesting things on sale, but the Day of the Dead market is superior.

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Note: The horror story I mentioned about a week ago likely will appear here on Saturday. I’ve emerged from the grim tale intact. Stay tuned, as they say.

Easter with pointy hats

WE TAKE EASTER Week pretty seriously hereabouts with a number of parades that start on Thursday evening. The Procession of Silence is the favorite of most.

It was not up to snuff this year. Seemed a little shorter than usual and a tad disorganized. I may be wrong about that. This particular procession comes off far better after night falls, but they start before then, and that’s when I saw it yesterday.

Many of the participants tote candles, which do zip until it’s dark. The whole shebang is simply spookier at night. Since it starts just before nightfall and winds slowly around downtown, the latter half does happen in the dark.

You’d never see this in the United States because the robes and pointy hats would send people who vote for Democrats into fits of  “offended” rage. Sad.

The bedroom wall

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RETURNING HOME late yesterday afternoon after sitting on the big plaza downtown, watching workmen erect metal scaffolds to support canvas roofs under which the yearly Semana Santa market will unfold next week, I walked into the bedroom and noticed this part of the wall in the light of early evening.

The camera asked for a flash, but I ignored it.

The lamp light did the trick, along with a little extra from the nearby window. Sometimes, you just gotta follow your gut instinct.