Off the proverbial charts

Photo from The New York Times, making absurd comparisons.

I occasionally skim the websites of The New York Times and The Washington Post out of curiosity and to gauge the high levels of nincompoopery you encounter there.

At the very top of The Post‘s page today we are told “Domestic terror incidents surge, led by white supremacists and far right.” This conclusion, we’re informed, comes from “an analysis” done by — wait for it — The Washington Post itself! This is arrant nonsense, and one wonders if The Post knows of the ongoing Antifa riots? Over the weekend, for instance, Antifa torched a Portland federal building with immigration agents trapped inside.

There was zero mention of that by either The Post or The Times. Not a peep.

Let’s turn now to what inspired me to write what I am now writing. It may be the most hilariously outrageous leftist delusional nonsense of the year. Right there on The New York Times website, giving new meaning to the word chutzpah, is a piece headlined: Can Biden Be Our FDR? I swear you cannot make this stuff up.

Nation of silly people

In the early 1990s, when I was still a Democrat, I watched Bill Maher’s TV show, Politically Incorrect, when I visited my mother in Atlanta. I liked Maher, and I liked the name of his show. Even when I was a Democrat, I considered political correctness horrendous.

And now PC is the bedrock of the Democrat Party.

When I wised up in 2008 and abandoned the Democrat Party, which I now correctly call the Democrat Socialist Party, I continued to see Maher online now and then. He considers himself a classical liberal and often criticizes today’s Democrat Socialists, which is smart, but he also badmouths Trump, which is ignorant.

Though primarily a leftist, Maher is often a fence-sitter. He straddles it with one leg in the Democrat Party and the other in a sea of common sense. One side is rank and smelly while the other side is clear thinking and sunshine.

But he sometimes hits topics on the nail head, which he does in this video. For years, I have called America a nation of spoiled people, folks who’ve never faced an existential threat in their lives, people who do not know history.

Maher is at times humorous and potty-mouthed (because he’s a Democrat) in the video, but what he’s saying is serious as a cemetery. And true.

The one-eyed Mexican

Photo taken yesterday shortly after returning home.

We must stop meeting like this. Bandaged up, I mean. Just last November I posted this photo from a hospital bed with much of my nose covered in bandages, which was mostly unnecessary, I later learned. And now it’s the eye.

But this was necessary. At least I hope so. Yesterday morning at 9:30 I arrived at the Clínica David in the nearby capital city for laser cataract surgery, not knowing exactly what to expect, but from what I had heard and read it didn’t seem to be a very big deal, procedure-wise. I did hope the outcome would be a very big deal, however, because I had developed serious problems with night vision, which is perilous for night driving.

Right on time I was taken near the operating room where I doffed all my duds minus my skivvies and socks and donned one of those hospital gowns. In the operating room I lay down on the surgical table, and I was covered with a warm blanket. It was chilly.

There were six other people there, including the anestheologist and my ophthamologist, Dr. Adolfo Chacón Lara, whose photo you can see on their website. Dr. Chacón has been my eye doctor for years.

The actual procedure lasted less than 10 minutes and was not uncomfortable in the slightest. I don’t know what sort of anesthesia I was given, but it did not seem to put me to sleep, but I think it did. Dr. Chacón told me to close my eyes, which I did, and I had the impression my eyes were closed during the entire procedure, which is impossible, of course.

I could lightly feel the work being done and the bandage being put in place. He then said everything had gone fine. The next thing I remember I opened my other eye, and a nurse helped me stand up. The doctor was nowhere in sight, pun intended.

I have another appointment today at noon to have the bandage removed. This is being written yesterday a couple of hours after we got home. When I return home today, with both eyes working, I’ll have a better idea of the results. If all goes well, and I imagine it will, I’ll repeat the procedure as soon as possible because I suspect my eyes won’t be in sync.

The work yesterday cost the peso equivalent of $1,400 U.S., as will the other eye. I imagine alterations will be needed for my glasses, both those I use daily and my prescription sunglasses, so the jury is still out cost-wise.


MEDICAL INSURANCE AT LAST

Related to this is my decision, after two decades in Mexico, to purchase medical coverage before my luck runs out. At age 76, I have long passed the point of any insurance company wanting to roll the dice on me, so I am enrolling in IMSS, one of the government plans, and my child bride, at the tender age of just 60, is signing up with MetLife.

The Metlife policy will cost the peso equivalent of $800 U.S. for the first year and will, I am told, go up every year. There is a deductible of about $5,000 U.S. and after that a copay of 10 percent. The policy pays up to approximately $568,000 U.S. or over 11 million pesos. You’d have to be very unlucky to reach that limit in Mexico.

In the United States, of course, it would be easy.

The IMSS coverage, on the other hand, has no deductible or peak. You’re in the caring arms of Uncle José. The annual cost at my age and up to 80 is about 14,000 pesos or $700 U.S. After age 80, it goes up somewhat but not much, and you’re at the last payment level.

Why don’t we both enroll in IMSS, which seems the far better deal? Because IMSS clinics and hospitals can be dicey, to put it mildly. It’s the government, for Pete’s sake. You might get great service, and you might get lousy service. With MetLife, you get private hospitals, many of which are excellent, and you get to choose where you go.

You get what you pay for. Were I under age 70, I would go with MetLife too. I do not anticipate using my IMSS coverage except in the most dire circumstances, finance-wise. I’ll continue with private physicians, paying out of my own pocket. But it’s good to have a safety net.

The two of us have completed the enrollment process, and my coverage starts on March 1. Her coverage does not have a specific date, but it’s about a month from now. Her application is in the paperwork pipeline.

Take note, Obama and Biden: Mexico does not force everyone into the government system. It is an option, nothing more, and it exists alongside an excellent private system.


(Note: Any typos you spot in this post are due to my writing it with just one eye.)

National suicides

This is one of my favorite YouTube channels. It’s called History Debunked, and it’s run by a British author named Simon Webb. His videos usually run about five minutes. I believe this is just the second time I have posted one of his talks.

Go and subscribe. He is always entertaining and informative.

This one deals with the effects that “embracing diversity” has had on Scandinavian nations. It hasn’t been pretty. I am a staunch foe of encouraging multiculturalism because it usually leads to nasty things. It is a horrible fad embraced only by historically Caucasian cultures, specifically the clueless, violent, leftist element in those cultures.

Tragically, this element recently seized the White House.

You won’t find the fad in Ecuador, Vietnam, China, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia, Japan, etc., because political correctness has no foothold in those places. These sorts of nations have a strong sense of themselves, which is what keeps a nation intact.