Concrete mesas

banana

MESA MEANS table in Spanish. I now have two mesas in the yard where damnable bananas long held sway.

The photo above was taken on a nice summer day. You see two stands of banana. One is just this side of the black-rock Alamo Wall, and the other one, higher, is beyond. A third, which abuts the house itself, is not visible.

More on it below.

As recently noted in the post dubbed The winter scalp, banana trees, which I stupidly planted years back when they were cute little babies, had become the curse of my life.

I have taken concrete action against two of the three. The ground in which they grew has been covered with concrete and stone, which is raised to form two mesas.

I could have simply covered them with concrete and stone at ground level, but the two mesas give me places to set things, maybe artsy-fartsy stuff to give drama to the yard.

Below are photos of the work:

No. 1
Removing banana remnants with machete and pickax.
No. 2
Early stages of mesa No. 1.
head
Work done. No more freaking banana trees here! It’s 60 centimeters tall.

Now I need to find a stone or metal sculpture to dress it up.

DSCF0399

Long, long ago, I planted a little banana tree in this corner against the house. It grew high and multiplied. I snapped this photo one dark night many years back.

It grew and grew and grew until it was impossible to walk into this corner or even see the corner, so it had to be eliminated.

To wit:

shot 1
Workman with pickax uprooting banana bases and roots.

That big aloe vera bush, left side of photo just above, was not even planted when I took the night photo.

two
Second mesa just lacking fill at this point.
rubble
Interior is filled with rubble from God knows where.
casa
All done. This one is larger than the other. Also needs a sculpture.

And that concludes another construction caper. The toil spanned four six-hour days, and the total price for material and labor was 2,450 pesos, about 135 bucks. I tossed in a 200-peso tip because that’s the kind of guy I am.

I’ve loved stone and mountains all my life, and now — at last — I’m surrounded by both. Life is good.

Life and death

lady

THE HACIENDA lawn is large and contains many things to catch the eye. This caught my eye this morning and, being a sharing sort of guy, I’m sharing with you.

Here’s an interesting article that was brought to my attention today by a woman who prefers red shoes to bacon.

I, on the other hand, prefer bacon.

But I like red roses.

The sound of honeybees

bees

THE OLD MAN was walking down the stone sidewalk when he realized he felt no stone. And then he saw that he was an inch or so above the surface, which was quite strange.

Being a quick study, he knew that he was dead. He stopped the stroll and looked around. The sky was not blue. It was as clear green as the sea off Luquillo Beach in Puerto Rico where he had once lived. And the rock wall in front of him was pink with yellow highlights.

Dead, but he had ascended only an inch or so, which was quite insufficient, he knew. Perhaps there was bad karma to burn off. If so, he had no idea how to do that. Perhaps a voice would tell him.

But there was no voice. Just the soft sound of honeybees.

He stood stock still and waited for further instructions.