A stark contrast

Above you see a typical Trump rally. Below you see the CNN “Town Hall” staged by Biden’s handlers a few days ago in which the “president” stumbled and mumbled his way through the event.

When it ended, Kamala Harris tossed a sack over Biden’s head, steered him out the back door, heaved him into the limo where Hillary, Bill and Barack were waiting, drove him back to the White House and propped him up again behind the desk in the Oval Office with a bowl of warm porridge. And soon it was bedtime.

Are those empty seats?

The morning news

This is not me in the photo. Just so you know.

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When I lived in Houston, Texas, I worked evenings till about 1 a.m., and I would stay in bed the following morning till around 9. My wife would have already departed for her job, so I would be alone.

She would have scooped up The Wall Street Journal from our suburban lawn and left it inside for me. I would sit in the living room in a wing chair and read it. The previous night I would have read The Houston Chronicle because that’s where I worked.

I wish I still had access to The Wall Street Journal, but I don’t. No physical newspaper awaits me in the mornings because there is no home delivery. I don’t know if there is U.S.-style home delivery anywhere in Mexico. Or if it still exists above the Rio Bravo.

Now I get out of bed about 7 a.m., and I climb the stairs to the second floor, turn on the H-P All-in-One and read the news online. Mostly, I read these three in this order: Breitbart, Gateway Pundit, and the New York Post. The last one is more for chuckles than anything.

On very rare occasion, I open The New York Times and The Washington Post if I am curious about the Democrat Party’s line of the day.

This morning, Breitbart tells me the University of Rhode Island has decided not to destroy World War II murals, that Marvel Comics has Captain America saying the American Dream is a lie, that Albuquerque social studies “recommended books” for students are all about “race and queerness,” and that Cori Bush says July 4 is only for white people because black Americans still aren’t free.

This, she says, from her office in the U.S. Congress.

I also learn a Black Lives Matter chapter in Utah deems the American flag a “symbol of hatred.”

I open The New York Times, and see nothing of this. I do read “why record-breaking overnight temperatures are so concerning” and that a 14-year-old has become the first black American to win the spelling bee and that world economic leaders are meeting to finalize a global tax agreement and that “the G.O.P. heads further into the abyss.”

The NYT also seems to think Joe Biden is actually the president instead of being a Deep State figurehead stooge with downward spiraling dementia. And that woman with the desired skin tone and genitalia waits in the warm-up box. She’s known, like a villain in a Batman story, as The Cackler.

I weep for the nation. As should we all.

A summer deluge

Video was shot yesterday afternoon.

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Those canvas curtains come down in early June when the monsoon season starts, and they roll up in November, which is about when the world dries up in those parts.

This is our third summer under the new terraza roof which included those canvas curtains to avoid as much rainwater during the daily downpours as possible. We left one side open because we didn’t want to be totally enclosed for five or six months a year. If the rain blows from that direction, we just have to deal with it.

The clear section in the curtains was entirely transparent until a hailstorm last year blew one of them out, shredding it entirely. The sun damage after only one year had rotted it significantly. We called Nico, the guy who sold and installed the curtains, and he replaced those center sections with tougher material, which is not transparent, but it still lets light in.

Our fingers are crossed that this will hold up longer, especially since Nico, it appears, was one of the many business casualties of the Kung Flu hysteria. His establishment downtown has been gone for months. However, there is a good chance he now operates out of his home. I have his phone number.

Singapore is smart

When the Kung Flu was flung upon the world stage about March of last year, I was concerned. Everyone was concerned. It was being hyped almost as the Black Plague. Stay home, governments hollered via their pals in the news media, or you’ll die. My child bride and I obeyed and stayed home except for shopping.

I bet you did the same.

A couple of months later, I noticed the streets were not lined with corpses, plus I knew no one who had died or even caught the Kung Flu. Phooey with this, I told myself, and we went out and about, starting May 10, doing what we normally did, but often with masks, and maintaining that distance thing.

Time passed, and I paid attention to the news, not so much the mainstream (government) media, but other information sources that seemed more realistic and honest. I became less and less concerned about the Kung Flu. These days I wear no mask except to enter the occasional store where it’s required. I do not do “social distance.”

There is a Mexican government website that keeps track of Kung Flu cases in virtually every nook and cranny of Mexico. I’ve been watching it since last year. To date, about 1.65 percent of my town’s population has been infected in some way, which is to say over 98 percent of our 98,000 population has not caught Kung Flu. Of the minuscule proportion that has, almost all would have recovered at home in bed with Tylenol or something similar.

Comparatively small percentages exist almost everywhere, so this is not the Black Plague. The economic shutdowns were unnecessary, and the people most affected by them are the working class. Government officials, as everyone who’s paying attention knows, have gone about their business as usual. Salaries, exotic vacations and parties. Don’t know about this? I suggest you broaden your news-gathering scope.

Incredibly, one of the most ham-fisted government overreactions to the pandemic is Australia, and that’s going on to this day. Coincidentally, one of the best news organizations anywhere in the world is Sky News Australia. In the video above, the engaging Alan Jones reports on how Singapore is handling the pandemic now.

Even more details are available at The Straits Times. Singapore is smart.


The Political Plague

This is the first political pandemic in world history. What’s up with that? I have my suspicions. A recent Gallup Poll asked if people with no symptoms and otherwise healthy should remain at home or go out and live their lives normally. About 80 percent of Republicans in America said go out and live normally. Over 70 percent of Democrats said stay home, i.e. continue cowering in the closet. Incredible.