Credit card craziness

WHEN THE PRESIDENT called Barry signed legislation a year or so ago, he canceled my U.S. bank account and the U.S. accounts of many other U.S. citizens living outside America.

This colossally ill-conceived legislation goes by its initials, FATCA. You can look it up if you care. Basically, it was intended to nail fat cats who were hiding their riches in offshore accounts. What it actually did was hose innocent Americans, mostly retirees, who had the good sense to live elsewhere.

I was one of those hose-ees.

flagThe United States is the only nation on earth that taxes money held by its citizens in other countries. It is a desperation move due to the sea of bloody red ink the nation irresponsibly swims in.

Entitlements add up. Redistribution only goes so far.

FATCA did not directly cancel all those U.S. bank accounts. What it did was impose burdensome paperwork on banks in the United States with account holders living beyond the borders. And many banks, likely most, found it more convenient to just close the lower-end accounts.

Last July … with very little warning.

My U.S. bank was Banamex USA, the American branch of one of Mexico’s biggies, Banamex. Don’t let the name fool you. Banamex USA must play by U.S. rules. It’s owned by Citicorp.

WE DON’T WANT YOU ANYMORE

I opened the letter that arrived in my post office box in late June and read: After examining your account, we regret to inform you that we can no longer service your account. It will be closed on July 1.  I was mildly annoyed. It was only later that I began to think of all the fish I had in that sea.

The enormity of this event began to sink in.

I receive two pensions. One is Social Security. By pure luck, just months earlier I had switched the automatic deposit from Banamex USA to HSBC-Mexico where I had just opened an account due to dissatisfaction with the Mexican Banamex. But the other, corporate, pension was deposited in Banamex USA.

That corporate pension is distributed by an arm of Wells Fargo. I phoned them and was told they only did direct deposit to U.S. banks, not foreign ones, and the sole alternative was a check in the mail. The problem with Option Two is that you cannot deposit or cash a U.S. check in Mexico anymore.

Thank U.S. legislation again.

It is virtually impossible these days to open a U.S. bank account without a U.S. address and driver’s license, neither of which do I possess. So when Banamex USA dumped me, well, …

After lots of stress and frantic activity, I got Wells Fargo to initiate pension direct deposits outside the United States. I imagine I am still the only person they do that for.

When I moved to Mexico in 2000, I had just opened a checking account at Banamex USA, and I had three credit cards which were paid online from that account. Then the credit cards began to fall by the wayside.

The first to go was a Visa I used to pay for Sky TV in 2003. Without going into dreary details, Sky began to abuse the card. I asked the issuing bank to stop them, but the bank told me they could not, that only Sky could cancel the agreement.

Absurd. So, I canceled that card. Adiós, Sky TV. But adiós credit card too.

Two cards left. One was a Wells Fargo Mastercard, and the other was an AT&T Visa. I had my Mexican mailing address on both. Renewal cards for the AT&T Visa were express-mailed here with no problem. The Wells Fargo people, however, were much more ornery.

Their “fraud department,” before activating a renewal card, insisted I go to my local Banamex branch and have all manner of complex paperwork done to prove that I was the person I said I was. This paperwork would have been a real challenge at a Mexican bank where procedures are quite different.

WHERE THE SUN DON’T SHINE

I told Wells Fargo to put the card in what would have been a painful place had it been on a human being. There would have been no sunshine there. So I was down to just one credit card.

I consider two credit cards a minimum, so I went to my Banamex branch here in town and requested a credit card. They gave it to me with a limit of just 15,000 pesos, about 1,000 dollars. They absolutely would not raise the limit to something reasonable. And there was a sizable annual fee.

About a year later, I canceled it in a snit, and was left with one card. I use credit cards exclusively online, absolutely nowhere else, but online is important because I shell out not much, but regularly, online.

And then came last June’s letter from Banamex USA, canceling my account and leaving me with no easy way to pay the AT&T Visa card. I still have the card, but it sits idle and useless.

I returned to Banamex and asked them to reissue the card I had canceled. Nah, they said. FATCA was not mentioned, but that is without a doubt the reason they would not reissue the card.

My U.S. citizenship was mentioned. Thanks to Washington D.C., again.

I canceled my longtime account at Banamex in Mexico. It had always been a pain anyway.

TOO OLD TO TRUST

So I went into my local HSBC-Mexico branch and asked for a credit card. At age 70, I was too old, I was informed. Yes, age discrimination is alive and well down south. It’s an unfair world. But I don’t get huffy. It’s life.

As I consider two credit cards a minimum, I also consider two banks a minimum, so I opened an account with BBVA Bancomer. For a credit card, they require an account to be open a few months and that a minimum balance of 6,000 pesos be maintained. I did that.

On Wednesday, they gave me a nice, shiny, blue Visa card with a 50,000-peso limit, which is okay. My child bride has a high-balance account with HSBC-Mexico that came with a no-questions-asked credit card, and spouses automatically get one too. I got one last year, but it’s connected to her account.

No matter. My two-card minimum is fulfilled.

So what did I do the eight months between the time my AT&T Visa was sidelined and getting my own Bancomer Visa this week? I used my HSBC-Mexico debit card for online purchases, which is not wise. Debit card purchases come right out of your checking account. A credit card provides a security barrier.

LAND OF THE CHESHIRE CAT

catWeirdly, a week ago, every online account that used my HSBC-Mexico debit card found that charges were rejected. This came out of the blue.

HSBC-Mexico says there is no reason for this to be happening, but it is happening. I view this as part of the Alice-in-Wonderland tone of Mexican life.

Thursday, I switched all online charges to my shiny new Bancomer Visa. I am a happy boy. Everything works out if you wait long enough. It is the way of the Goddess.

(If you read all the way down here about my credit card situation, you deserve a medal.)

* * * *

(Update: About six months later, I got a phone call from HSBC-Mexico, asking if I wanted a credit card. Apparently, I’m not too old to trust after all. I accepted the card.)

The American mess

IT’S A GREAT time to be a Mexican. The economy is headed uphill. Reforms to correct longstanding problems are gradually taking effect. Democracy is working well since 2000. The government does not attempt to micromanage our personal lives. The infrastructure improves daily. And we have a president who’s handsome.

US flagThen there’s the United States. Its economy still struggles. There are no reforms to correct anything that matters. Democracy, we sadly observe, works poorly with an ignorant electorate. The government wants to micromanage personal lives. The infrastructure degrades daily. And there is a clueless, ineffectual president.

The southern border is a sieve where hordes of people pour illegally into the country with scant impediment. Lots of children lately. Cities and states offer them “sanctuary,” drivers’ licenses and handouts. The nation’s educational curriculum is left-wing and anti-American. Free speech is verboten on university campuses.

Taxes are high, especially on businesses. The money is misused. The ranks of the government-supported “disabled” grow daily as does the illegitimacy rate, especially in urban ghettos. The national debt soars to incredible levels, and nobody does anything about it in either party. Capitalism (i.e. liberty) is sneered at.

As money grows for the faux disabled, money decreases for the military in this increasingly uncertain world.

Traditional families, gender roles and religions are also sneered at. Emotional deviancy, which has crafted its own flags to wave, is celebrated, protected by law and rubbed in the faces of the huge majority.

Children are confused and left on their own.

On the international stage, the clueless, ineffectual president none too subtly favors dangerous religious fanatics whom he does not consider to be such due to his being poorly informed and devoted to left-wing multicultural pipe dreams. And this very perilous presidency favors unlawful, unilateral action to consensus.

mex flagYes, America is a mess.

It’s a great time to be a Mexican.

Ouch! Ouch! Ouch!

(If you tend toward attacks of the vapors, best not watch the video. Really.)

BUT IF YOU’RE made of harder stuff and possess a streak of adventure, let’s move on. Grab your fur-lined handcuffs, leather hood and straps.

This video with a chirpy little coed aims to make you feel all right about sadism, masochism and bondage. Her Valley Girl manner of speech is like fingernails across a blackboard.

I have no problem with BDSM, as it is known to the cognoscenti, because I have no problem with whatever consenting adults do to one another under the covers … or hanging from a roof beam … or trussed over a barrel and gagged.

What is appalling about this video, and it’s one of a series, is its connection to Planned Parenthood, which receives annually over $500 million in government grants. Your tax money at work, amigos. Did anybody ask if that’s okay with you?

I always thought Planned Parenthood dedicated itself to birth-control advice and — if that advice was not followed — offering safe abortions. Well, safe for mama.

But no. They also teach how to use fur-lined handcuffs.

Why do you need instructions for that? Just snap them closed around each of your victim’s partner’s wrists. Start spanking or grab a whip. It’s easy.

* * * *

(Note: For more information brought to you by Planned Parenthood, and to hear more screeching from that girl, Laci Green, don’t miss A Naked Notion.)

Fog of winter

Fog

WE HEAR it’s pretty dang cold above the Rio Bravo.

Here on our Mexican mountaintop, things are mostly following the blueprint. Quite cool to cold in the mornings, then getting mild and sunny later in the day.

Sometimes mornings bring fog, as you see in the photo.

What’s odd this January is Birds of Paradise are in bloom, and Red Hot Pokers too. We rarely see that. Must be global warming. I’m neutral on the global warming dispute, not being a scientist, but did you catch the incredible irony of that research ship that was caught in the Antarctic ice recently? Its mission: study global warming.

Most of the news media chose not to report that point. It damaged their worldview.

What you don’t see in the photo is that our monster bougainvillea has lost most of its leaves and flowers. I’ll get Abel, the deadpan yardman, to take this opportunity to whack it back in a week or two. I have clippers, but he will prefer a machete.

It’s also time for house repairs. Our currently favorite albañil (guy who builds and repairs) will come by tomorrow morning to give us prices. There will be some waterproofing paint, some reconnection of clay ceiling tiles, some reconnection and grouting of ceramic floor tiles, stuff like that. Then we’ll be good as new, almost.

Other things on the to-do list: Tax forms and renewing my child bride’s U.S. visa.