A history of transportation

The first car I ever owned was a 1956 Plymouth Savoy, just as you see here. It had been my grandmother’s but when she died my parents gave it to me in 1967. I was married with a kid, so it was much appreciated. My first wife and I were living in a rental in Uptown New Orleans, and our only transportation was the St. Charles streetcar, and we had to walk a few blocks to get to the streetcar line.

The streetcar was a fun way to get around, but for convenience a car is preferred. This photo was probably taken about 10 years before we were streetcar regulars on the same route.

The Plymouth carried us a few years, but in 1969 I got a decent-paying job on the New Orleans newspaper. I don’t remember what happened to the Plymouth, but I bought a mid-’60s VW Bug convertible and, boy, was that fun. I found this photo online. I don’t know who the blonde is.

When my first wife and I divorced in 1971, I left the Beetle with her, and she fairly quickly destroyed it by neglect. I moved to the French Quarter, and a bicycle became my transportation until I bought a BSA motorcycle which I shipped to Puerto Rico in 1973. The BSA stayed in Puerto Rico when I left the island about a year later.

Yep, me.

In New Orleans again, I was back on a bicycle, but later I bought a 1977 Harley-Davidson Sportster. I met my second wife-to-be in the mid-’70s, and her 1975 Toyota Corolla became “our” car for years.

Then another Corolla, bought used, and then yet another, also used, when she totaled the previous one while racing a stoplight.

After 19 years we parted company in 1995 and again I had no car. That’s when I bought my first-ever new, four-wheeled vehicle, a 1995 Ford Ranger, a pickup I kept five years until I moved to Mexico.

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Mexico

Here I purchased four new cars over 14 years. First, in 2000, a Chevy Pop, a sweet, little thing not sold in the United States. It was a Geo Metro clone with no AC or even a radio that we drove all the way to Atlanta and back in 2003. Then, in 2004, a Chevrolet Meriva, also not available in the United States. Then, in 2009, a Honda CR-V. Then, in 2014, we bought a Nissan March for my child bride.

We still own those last two, which brings me to the purpose of this post. What’s gonna come next? I have a system.

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My Honda CR-V has been the best car I’ve ever owned. Twelve years and not a single problem of any consequence. The thing runs like it did the day I drove it out of the dealership in the nearby capital city in early 2009. I’d never owned a Honda before.

Looking ahead to the day when I may need a new car due to an accident, robbery or an expense so high it’s better to just buy a new car, I like to have the next vehicle chosen. I would prefer another Honda, but the CR-Vs have doubled in price since 2009, and I won’t pay that.

I don’t have a job.

I turned to Kia, specifically the oddly named Soul — good reviews and, though I am quite tall, I can get in and out with ease. So that was my backup for a couple of years till I discovered its rather meager ground clearance, not good in a nation loaded with speed bumps.

Sticking with Kia, I turned to the Seltos, which only appeared on this side of the world relatively recently though it’s long been wildly popular in India. It was my top alternative till just a few days ago when I visited a dealership and sat in the HR-V, a relatively new addition to the Honda line that was upgraded this year. Wowzer!

The mid-model I like costs 403,900 pesos, which is about $20,000 U.S. right now, plus selling my CR-V would trim that down a bit. You cannot haggle at Mexican dealerships like you do above the border.

It’s not as large as the CR-V, but it’s large enough, plenty of headroom. And it’s a good deal less pricey than the CR-V.

It’s my new main man. But I need a reason to buy one aside from just wanting to, like a teenager. Maybe I should drive my current Honda into a tree because I don’t think it’s ever going to wear out.

It appears that when you buy a Honda, you have it for life.

The new Honda HR-V is not a Plymouth Savoy.

Crooks, cash, cars

NEVER A DULL moment here. I offer examples:

Three armed nitwits decided to rob a bus heading north from Mexico City to the burg of Pachuca.  They boarded as passengers but soon revealed their evil intentions.

One of the geniuses fired a bullet upward to scare the passengers. The bullet bounced off the roof and killed one of the other bandidos. In the ensuing confusion, passengers grabbed a surviving genius and beat him to death.

Passengers held the third genius for police.

I love this sort of yarn. You can read details right here.

But, really, I can’t stop laughing.

* * * *

Moving away from crime, let’s look at banking.

Up until last year a bit over half of Mexican adults had no bank account. But in the last year that percentage has risen a nice 12 percent. Credit card use is up too, a mixed blessing.

I find this encouraging — that we are less inclined to keep our cash under the mattress.

You can read details right here.

I have accounts at two Mexican banks, and both include credit cards. I no longer have a U.S. bank account nor U.S. credit cards. Obama’s boys screwed that up for me.

* * * *

One of Mexico’s most popular cars will go out of existence around 2019. The Nissan Tsuru.

Mexico is finally getting serious about safety standards. Also feeling the axe will be the Chevrolet Aveo and Matiz, the Nissan Tiida and the Volkswagen Gol.

But it’s the Tsuru that will be most missed. It is everywhere, especially in taxi fleets. Before we bought my wife’s Nissan March two years ago, we considered a Tsuru but decided against it specifically for the safety factors.

You can read more about the changes right here.

The never-changing Tsuru bears a remarkable resemblance to the Toyota Corolla I owned in Houston. Why is that?